Against discontinuism: Mental time travel and our knowledge of past and future events. Michaelian, K. In Michaelian, K., Klein, S. B., & Szpunar, K. K., editors, Seeing The Future: Theoretical Perspectives on Future-Oriented Mental Time Travel, pages 63–92. Oxford University Press, New York, 2016.
abstract   bibtex   
[first paragraph] Over the last several decades, the psychology of memory has undergone a major reorientation away from earlier conceptions of episodic memory as a specialized system dedicated to the storage and retrieval of information about the “what, when, and where” of past events and toward a conception of episodic remembering as a form of constructive mental time travel (MTT). Reinforced by impressive brain imaging evidence and extensive research on representational and phenomenological overlap between remembering the past and imagining the future (for recent reviews, see Klein, 2013; Schacter et al. 2012; Szpunar 2010), this new conception emphasizes the deep similarities between episodic memory, future-oriented mental time travel (FMTT), and, increasingly, processes such as episodic counterfactual thinking (De Brigard, 2014; De Brigard & Gessell, Chapter 8 of this volume; Pezzulo, Chapter 13 of this volume), in which the subject imagines alternatives to past events. Taking the new conception to its logical conclusion, many have argued that, rather than distinct faculties of episodic remembering and imagining, what we in fact have is “a single general faculty of mental time travel” (Suddendorf & Corballis, 2007). On this view, remembering the past and imagining the future are strictly continuous.
@incollection{Michaelian2016b,
abstract = {[first paragraph] Over the last several decades, the psychology of memory has undergone a major reorientation away from earlier conceptions of episodic memory as a specialized system dedicated to the storage and retrieval of information about the “what, when, and where” of past events and toward a conception of episodic remembering as a form of constructive mental time travel (MTT). Reinforced by impressive brain imaging evidence and extensive research on representational and phenomenological overlap between remembering the past and imagining the future (for recent reviews, see Klein, 2013; Schacter et al. 2012; Szpunar 2010), this new conception emphasizes the deep similarities between episodic memory, future-oriented mental time travel (FMTT), and, increasingly, processes such as episodic counterfactual thinking (De Brigard, 2014; De Brigard {\&} Gessell, Chapter 8 of this volume; Pezzulo, Chapter 13 of this volume), in which the subject imagines alternatives to past events. Taking the new conception to its logical conclusion, many have argued that, rather than distinct faculties of episodic remembering and imagining, what we in fact have is “a single general faculty of mental time travel” (Suddendorf {\&} Corballis, 2007). On this view, remembering the past and imagining the future are strictly continuous.},
address = {New York},
author = {Michaelian, Kourken},
booktitle = {Seeing The Future: Theoretical Perspectives on Future-Oriented Mental Time Travel},
editor = {Michaelian, Kourken and Klein, Stanley B. and Szpunar, Karl K.},
file = {:Users/michaelk/Library/Application Support/Mendeley Desktop/Downloaded/Michaelian - 2016 - Against discontinuism Mental time travel and our knowledge of past and future events.pdf:pdf},
pages = {63--92},
publisher = {Oxford University Press},
title = {{Against discontinuism: Mental time travel and our knowledge of past and future events}},
year = {2016}
}
Downloads: 0