Bacterioplankton Biogeography of the Atlantic Ocean: A Case Study of the Distance-Decay Relationship. Milici, M., Tomasch, J., Wos-Oxley, M., L., Decelle, J., Jáuregui, R., Wang, H., Deng, Z., Plumeier, I., Giebel, H., Badewien, T., H., Wurst, M., Pieper, D., H., Simon, M., & Wagner-Döbler, I. Frontiers in Microbiology, 4, 2016.
Bacterioplankton Biogeography of the Atlantic Ocean: A Case Study of the Distance-Decay Relationship [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
In order to determine the influence of geographical distance, depth, and Longhurstian province on bacterial community composition and compare it with the composition of photosynthetic micro-eukaryote communities, 382 samples from a depth-resolved latitudinal transect (51◦S–47◦N) from the epipelagic zone of the Atlantic ocean were analyzed by Illumina amplicon sequencing. In the upper 100m of the ocean, community similarity decreased toward the equator for 6000 km, but subsequently increased again, reaching similarity values of 40–60% for samples that were separated by ∼12,000 km, resulting in a U-shaped distance-decay curve. We conclude that adaptation to local conditions can override the linear distance-decay relationship in the upper epipelagial of the Atlantic Ocean which is apparently not restrained by barriers to dispersal, since the same taxa were shared between the most distant communities. The six Longhurstian provinces covered by the transect were comprised of distinct microbial communities; ∼30% of variation in community composition could be explained by province. Bacterial communities belonging to the deeper layer of the epipelagic zone (140–200 m) lacked a distance-decay relationship altogether and showed little provincialism. Interestingly, those biogeographical patterns were consistently found for bacteria from three different size fractions of the plankton with different taxonomic composition, indicating conserved underlying mechanisms. Analysis of the chloroplast 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that phytoplankton composition was strongly correlated with both free-living and particle associated bacterial community composition (R between 0.51 and 0.62, p < 0.002). The data show that biogeographical patterns commonly found in macroecology do not hold for marine bacterioplankton, most likely because dispersal and evolution occur at drastically different rates in bacteria. Keywords:
@article{
 title = {Bacterioplankton Biogeography of the Atlantic Ocean: A Case Study of the Distance-Decay Relationship},
 type = {article},
 year = {2016},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Particle associated bacteria,bacterioplankton,biogeography,distance-decay relationship,macroecology,marine bacteria,microalgae,oceanographic province},
 volume = {7},
 websites = {http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmicb.2016.00590},
 month = {4},
 day = {26},
 id = {5a04972d-cb25-3b47-a5f4-6de83b0dd63b},
 created = {2016-05-23T15:08:54.000Z},
 file_attached = {false},
 profile_id = {9e8929f8-811d-3561-b42b-6003aef71c7c},
 group_id = {98cf6291-ef58-3f8a-a4b6-c8754044662f},
 last_modified = {2016-06-16T13:23:12.000Z},
 tags = {2016,sbr_phyto_eppo},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 abstract = {In order to determine the influence of geographical distance, depth, and Longhurstian province on bacterial community composition and compare it with the composition of photosynthetic micro-eukaryote communities, 382 samples from a depth-resolved latitudinal transect (51◦S–47◦N) from the epipelagic zone of the Atlantic ocean were analyzed by Illumina amplicon sequencing. In the upper 100m of the ocean, community similarity decreased toward the equator for 6000 km, but subsequently increased again, reaching similarity values of 40–60% for samples that were separated by ∼12,000 km, resulting in a U-shaped distance-decay curve. We conclude that adaptation to local conditions can override the linear distance-decay relationship in the upper epipelagial of the Atlantic Ocean which is apparently not restrained by barriers to dispersal, since the same taxa were shared between the most distant communities. The six Longhurstian provinces covered by the transect were comprised of distinct microbial communities; ∼30% of variation in community composition could be explained by province. Bacterial communities belonging to the deeper layer of the epipelagic zone (140–200 m) lacked a distance-decay relationship altogether and showed little provincialism. Interestingly, those biogeographical patterns were consistently found for bacteria from three different size fractions of the plankton with different taxonomic composition, indicating conserved underlying mechanisms. Analysis of the chloroplast 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that phytoplankton composition was strongly correlated with both free-living and particle associated bacterial community composition (R between 0.51 and 0.62, p < 0.002). The data show that biogeographical patterns commonly found in macroecology do not hold for marine bacterioplankton, most likely because dispersal and evolution occur at drastically different rates in bacteria. Keywords:},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Milici, Mathias and Tomasch, Jürgen and Wos-Oxley, Melissa L. and Decelle, Johan and Jáuregui, Ruy and Wang, Hui and Deng, Zhi-Luo and Plumeier, Iris and Giebel, Helge-Ansgar and Badewien, Thomas H. and Wurst, Mascha and Pieper, Dietmar H. and Simon, Meinhard and Wagner-Döbler, Irene},
 journal = {Frontiers in Microbiology},
 number = {April}
}
Downloads: 0