Research in Atrial Fibrillation: A Scientometric Analysis Using the Novel Web Application SciPE. Millenaar, D.; Fehlmann, T.; Scholz, S.; Pavlicek, V.; Flohr, A.; Dillmann, M.; Böhm, M.; Keller, A.; Mahfoud, F.; and Ukena, C. JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology, 6(8):1008 - 1018, 2020.
Research in Atrial Fibrillation: A Scientometric Analysis Using the Novel Web Application SciPE [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Objectives This study sought to determine the quantity and quality of publications in AF research using large-scale scientometric data analyses. Background Research in atrial fibrillation (AF) has increased over time. The increasing number of research papers makes it harder to identify relevant research work. Methods All 21,603 publications from 1945 to 2018 were retrieved from Web of Science and analyzed regarding geographical distribution of scientific output and international research cooperation. Results The total number of AF publications has significantly increased since the millennium change, from 3,063 (14.2%) in 1945 to 1999 to 18,540 (85.8%) publications in 2000 to 2018. AF research grew 10-fold compared with overall medical research since 1990 (ratio of AF publications to all publications: 0.02% (n = 99 of 410,701) in 1990 vs. 0.2% (n = 1,967 of 1,172,649) in 2018; p < 0.05). Quantitatively, the United States contributed 25.9% of AF research, followed by Japan (8.0%), Germany (7.8%), China (7.3%), and the United Kingdom (5.9%). In the all-time modified h-index, the United States ranked first (13.3% of all nations), followed by Canada (8.5%) and the United Kingdom (6.3%). In relation to population, Denmark was the best-rated nation, with the lowest number of inhabitants per publication (11,457), followed by Sweden (18,426) and the Netherlands (25,749), and per modified h-index (90,746), followed by Sweden (170,602) and the Netherlands (218,203). Measuring publications per research institute, Denmark again ranked first, with 19.2 publications per institute, followed by Italy (14.9) and Sweden (13.8). An intensive cooperation between nations was apparent. Conclusions This study showed an increase in publication activity in AF research. The United States was the leading country in quantity of research efforts. Related to population and research institutes, Denmark ranked first.
@article{MILLENAAR20201008,
title = {Research in Atrial Fibrillation: A Scientometric Analysis Using the Novel Web Application SciPE},
journal = {JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology},
volume = {6},
number = {8},
pages = {1008 - 1018},
year = {2020},
issn = {2405-500X},
doi = {10.1016/j.jacep.2020.05.010},
url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2405500X20303819},
author = {Dominic Millenaar and Tobias Fehlmann and Sean Scholz and Valérie Pavlicek and Alexander Flohr and Markus Dillmann and Michael Böhm and Andreas Keller and Felix Mahfoud and Christian Ukena},
abstract = {Objectives
This study sought to determine the quantity and quality of publications in AF research using large-scale scientometric data analyses.
Background
Research in atrial fibrillation (AF) has increased over time. The increasing number of research papers makes it harder to identify relevant research work.
Methods
All 21,603 publications from 1945 to 2018 were retrieved from Web of Science and analyzed regarding geographical distribution of scientific output and international research cooperation.
Results
The total number of AF publications has significantly increased since the millennium change, from 3,063 (14.2%) in 1945 to 1999 to 18,540 (85.8%) publications in 2000 to 2018. AF research grew 10-fold compared with overall medical research since 1990 (ratio of AF publications to all publications: 0.02% (n = 99 of 410,701) in 1990 vs. 0.2% (n = 1,967 of 1,172,649) in 2018; p < 0.05). Quantitatively, the United States contributed 25.9% of AF research, followed by Japan (8.0%), Germany (7.8%), China (7.3%), and the United Kingdom (5.9%). In the all-time modified h-index, the United States ranked first (13.3% of all nations), followed by Canada (8.5%) and the United Kingdom (6.3%). In relation to population, Denmark was the best-rated nation, with the lowest number of inhabitants per publication (11,457), followed by Sweden (18,426) and the Netherlands (25,749), and per modified h-index (90,746), followed by Sweden (170,602) and the Netherlands (218,203). Measuring publications per research institute, Denmark again ranked first, with 19.2 publications per institute, followed by Italy (14.9) and Sweden (13.8). An intensive cooperation between nations was apparent.
Conclusions
This study showed an increase in publication activity in AF research. The United States was the leading country in quantity of research efforts. Related to population and research institutes, Denmark ranked first.}
}
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