Predictors of repeated "no-showing" to clinic appointments. Miller, A., J.; Chae, E.; Peterson, E.; and Ko, A., B. American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery, 36(3):411-414, 2015.
Predictors of repeated "no-showing" to clinic appointments [pdf]Paper  Predictors of repeated "no-showing" to clinic appointments [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Objective To determine the variables that contribute to repeated patient non-compliance with showing up to clinic appointments. Study design Retrospective chart review. Setting Single tertiary care academic institution. Subjects and Methods Patients who did not show up to 3 or more clinic appointments in the otolaryngology department in the Henry Ford Health System in metro Detroit, Michigan between July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012 area were compared to control patients randomly chosen from those who had appointments on the same day with the same provider as the no-show patients. Results 105 patients were identified who no-showed to 3 or more clinic appointments. Younger age, black race, and lower income were all found to be significant factors for patients missing appointments in a multiple variate model. On logistic regression, Medicaid insurance, closer distance from home to appointment, less bus transfers, and less time by bus travel were also found to correlate with no-showing. Conclusion Age, race, and income are significantly related to patient non-compliance with clinic appointments. Paradoxically, proximity to the clinical appointment location is also significantly related - we hypothesize this may be the result of significant income inequality in the metro Detroit population distribution. Follow up studies include analyzing factors that precluded patient access and interventions to improve compliance and decrease cost.
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 title = {Predictors of repeated "no-showing" to clinic appointments},
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 year = {2015},
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 pages = {411-414},
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 abstract = {Objective To determine the variables that contribute to repeated patient non-compliance with showing up to clinic appointments. Study design Retrospective chart review. Setting Single tertiary care academic institution. Subjects and Methods Patients who did not show up to 3 or more clinic appointments in the otolaryngology department in the Henry Ford Health System in metro Detroit, Michigan between July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012 area were compared to control patients randomly chosen from those who had appointments on the same day with the same provider as the no-show patients. Results 105 patients were identified who no-showed to 3 or more clinic appointments. Younger age, black race, and lower income were all found to be significant factors for patients missing appointments in a multiple variate model. On logistic regression, Medicaid insurance, closer distance from home to appointment, less bus transfers, and less time by bus travel were also found to correlate with no-showing. Conclusion Age, race, and income are significantly related to patient non-compliance with clinic appointments. Paradoxically, proximity to the clinical appointment location is also significantly related - we hypothesize this may be the result of significant income inequality in the metro Detroit population distribution. Follow up studies include analyzing factors that precluded patient access and interventions to improve compliance and decrease cost.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Miller, Anya J. and Chae, Esther and Peterson, Ed and Ko, Alvin B.},
 journal = {American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery},
 number = {3}
}
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