A bacterial symbiont protects honey bees from fungal disease. Miller, D., L.; Smith, E., A.; and Newton, I., L., G. 10, 2020.
A bacterial symbiont protects honey bees from fungal disease [pdf]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Fungi are the leading cause of insect disease, contributing to the decline of wild and managed populations1,2. For ecologically and economically critical species, such as the European honey bee (Apis mellifera), the presence and prevalence of fungal pathogens can have far reaching consequences, endangering other species and threatening food security3,4,5. Our ability to address fungal epidemics and opportunistic infections is currently hampered by the limited number of antifungal therapies6,7. Novel antifungal treatments are frequently of bacterial origin and produced by defensive symbionts (bacteria that associate with an animal/plant host and protect against natural enemies 89. Here we examined the capacity of a honey bee-associated bacterium, Bombella apis, to suppress the growth of fungal pathogens and ultimately protect bee brood (larvae and pupae) from infection. Our results showed that strains of B. apis inhibit the growth of two insect fungal pathogens, Beauveria bassiana and Aspergillus flavus, in vitro. This phenotype was recapitulated in vivo; bee brood supplemented with B. apis were significantly less likely to be infected by A. flavus. Additionally, the presence of B. apis reduced sporulation of A. flavus in the few bees that were infected. Analyses of biosynthetic gene clusters across B. apis strains suggest antifungal production via a Type I polyketide synthase. Secreted metabolites from B. apis alone were sufficient to suppress fungal growth, supporting this hypothesis. Together, these data suggest that B. apis protects bee brood from fungal infection by the secretion of an antifungal metabolite. On the basis of this discovery, new antifungal treatments could be developed to mitigate honey bee colony losses, and, in the future, could address fungal epidemics in other species.
@misc{
 title = {A bacterial symbiont protects honey bees from fungal disease},
 type = {misc},
 year = {2020},
 source = {bioRxiv},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Supported Papers},
 websites = {https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.01.21.914325v1.abstract,http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/2020.01.21.914325,https://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2020/01/23/2020.01.21.914325.full.pdf},
 month = {10},
 day = {15},
 id = {42e0c21a-dd6c-3618-9009-f03e7536dd78},
 created = {2020-10-16T17:03:47.184Z},
 file_attached = {false},
 profile_id = {ebf71185-c182-3db5-bed4-d33b5b693574},
 group_id = {49665d18-5720-3154-b3f7-40652b55b7b9},
 last_modified = {2020-10-16T17:04:06.052Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 source_type = {INPR},
 folder_uuids = {612726ba-fd49-424c-863a-6b20ad96dfd3},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {Fungi are the leading cause of insect disease, contributing to the decline of wild and managed populations1,2. For ecologically and economically critical species, such as the European honey bee (Apis mellifera), the presence and prevalence of fungal pathogens can have far reaching consequences, endangering other species and threatening food security3,4,5. Our ability to address fungal epidemics and opportunistic infections is currently hampered by the limited number of antifungal therapies6,7. Novel antifungal treatments are frequently of bacterial origin and produced by defensive symbionts (bacteria that associate with an animal/plant host and protect against natural enemies 89. Here we examined the capacity of a honey bee-associated bacterium, Bombella apis, to suppress the growth of fungal pathogens and ultimately protect bee brood (larvae and pupae) from infection. Our results showed that strains of B. apis inhibit the growth of two insect fungal pathogens, Beauveria bassiana and Aspergillus flavus, in vitro. This phenotype was recapitulated in vivo; bee brood supplemented with B. apis were significantly less likely to be infected by A. flavus. Additionally, the presence of B. apis reduced sporulation of A. flavus in the few bees that were infected. Analyses of biosynthetic gene clusters across B. apis strains suggest antifungal production via a Type I polyketide synthase. Secreted metabolites from B. apis alone were sufficient to suppress fungal growth, supporting this hypothesis. Together, these data suggest that B. apis protects bee brood from fungal infection by the secretion of an antifungal metabolite. On the basis of this discovery, new antifungal treatments could be developed to mitigate honey bee colony losses, and, in the future, could address fungal epidemics in other species.},
 bibtype = {misc},
 author = {Miller, Delaney L and Smith, Eric A and Newton, Irene L G}
}
Downloads: 0