Aristotle on phantasia. Modrak, D. K W In The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination, pages 15–26. Routledge, London, 2016.
abstract   bibtex   
[first paragraph] The breadth of Aristotle's conception of imagination (phantasia) is extraordinary and sets the stage for the discussion of imagination in subsequent literature.1 Aristotle appeals to phantasia to explain behavior of all sorts, especially to explain behavior that seems to be guided by reason, but is not, in cases where the agent (a child, a drunken adult or a nonrational animal) lacks the capacity for rational judgment. He also appeals to phantasia to explain the human mind's ability to transition seamlessly between perception and thought. In this capacity, phantasia is required for thinking. In addition, he assigns nonveridical perceptual experiences to phantasia, including cases of illusion, delusion and dreaming.
@incollection{Modrak2016,
abstract = {[first paragraph] The breadth of Aristotle's conception of imagination (phantasia) is extraordinary and sets the stage for the discussion of imagination in subsequent literature.1 Aristotle appeals to phantasia to explain behavior of all sorts, especially to explain behavior that seems to be guided by reason, but is not, in cases where the agent (a child, a drunken adult or a nonrational animal) lacks the capacity for rational judgment. He also appeals to phantasia to explain the human mind's ability to transition seamlessly between perception and thought. In this capacity, phantasia is required for thinking. In addition, he assigns nonveridical perceptual experiences to phantasia, including cases of illusion, delusion and dreaming.},
address = {London},
author = {Modrak, Deborah K W},
booktitle = {The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination},
editor = {Kind, Amy},
file = {:Users/michaelk/Library/Application Support/Mendeley Desktop/Downloaded/Modrak - 2016 - Aristotle on phantasia.pdf:pdf},
pages = {15--26},
publisher = {Routledge},
title = {{Aristotle on phantasia}},
year = {2016}
}
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