Sedimentary evolution and persistence of open forests between the south-eastern Alpine fringe and the Northern Dinarides during the Last Glacial Maximum. Monegato, G.; Ravazzi, C.; Culiberg, M.; Pini, R.; Bavec, M.; Calderoni, G.; Jež, J.; and Perego, R. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 436:23--40, October, 2015.
Sedimentary evolution and persistence of open forests between the south-eastern Alpine fringe and the Northern Dinarides during the Last Glacial Maximum [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Paleoenvironmental reconstruction at Alps–Dinarides fringe during the Last Glacial Maximum Relationships between regional geological frame, sedimentary environments, and forest history Persistence of trees and of different types of open boreal forest throughout the LGM We present a paleoenvironmental reconstruction for the mountain fringe between the South-Eastern Alps and the Northern Dinarides (NE-Italy/W-Slovenia) during the Last Glacial Maximum. We focused on a new sedimentary and paleoecological archive spanning the LGM acme, located in an aggrading, permanently flooded and ponded plain, dammed by an active fluvioglacial megafan. The ecosystem reconstruction, based on two high resolution pollen records, is supported by a rich plant macrofossil flora and constrained by a robust radiocarbon chronology between 26 and 22 cal ka BP. We show evidence for persistence of boreal trees and of different open boreal forest types throughout the LGM at the south-eastern mountain fringe of the Alps and the Northern Dinarides. Fire frequency is responsible for high, oscillating forest openness. The paleobotanical record is discussed in the light of the ecogeographic diversity of the region. A belt formed by Swiss stone pine, larch and dwarf mountain pine on limestone bedrock, and accompanied by Spruce in the floodplain, extended uphill, while proximal outwash plain supported Scots pine and dwarf mountain pine. These differences arise from groundwater regimes rather than from local climate variability. A steep moisture gradient from the semiarid pedoclimatic regime prevailing in the Adriatic alluvial plain to the forested mountain fringe is related to the orographic rainout triggered by southern air circulation. Mesophytic broad-leaved forest trees did not withstand the LGM temperature extremes in zonal ecosystems at the Alpine–Dinaric fringe; however, the fossil evidence suggests a number of microrefugia in karstic and thermal spring habitats of the northern Adriatic.
@article{citeulike:13778797,
    abstract = { Paleoenvironmental reconstruction at {Alps–Dinarides} fringe during the Last Glacial Maximum Relationships between regional geological frame, sedimentary environments, and forest history Persistence of trees and of different types of open boreal forest throughout the {LGM} We present a paleoenvironmental reconstruction for the mountain fringe between the {South-Eastern} Alps and the Northern Dinarides ({NE}-{Italy/W}-Slovenia) during the Last Glacial Maximum. We focused on a new sedimentary and paleoecological archive spanning the {LGM} acme, located in an aggrading, permanently flooded and ponded plain, dammed by an active fluvioglacial megafan. The ecosystem reconstruction, based on two high resolution pollen records, is supported by a rich plant macrofossil flora and constrained by a robust radiocarbon chronology between 26 and 22 cal ka {BP}. We show evidence for persistence of boreal trees and of different open boreal forest types throughout the {LGM} at the south-eastern mountain fringe of the Alps and the Northern Dinarides. Fire frequency is responsible for high, oscillating forest openness. The paleobotanical record is discussed in the light of the ecogeographic diversity of the region. A belt formed by Swiss stone pine, larch and dwarf mountain pine on limestone bedrock, and accompanied by Spruce in the floodplain, extended uphill, while proximal outwash plain supported Scots pine and dwarf mountain pine. These differences arise from groundwater regimes rather than from local climate variability. A steep moisture gradient from the semiarid pedoclimatic regime prevailing in the Adriatic alluvial plain to the forested mountain fringe is related to the orographic rainout triggered by southern air circulation. Mesophytic broad-leaved forest trees did not withstand the {LGM} temperature extremes in zonal ecosystems at the {Alpine–Dinaric} fringe; however, the fossil evidence suggests a number of microrefugia in karstic and thermal spring habitats of the northern Adriatic.},
    author = {Monegato, G. and Ravazzi, C. and Culiberg, M. and Pini, R. and Bavec, M. and Calderoni, G. and Je\v{z}, J. and Perego, R.},
    citeulike-article-id = {13778797},
    citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2015.06.025},
    doi = {10.1016/j.palaeo.2015.06.025},
    issn = {00310182},
    journal = {Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology},
    keywords = {alpine-environment, forest-resources, paleobotany},
    month = oct,
    pages = {23--40},
    posted-at = {2015-09-30 10:25:27},
    priority = {2},
    title = {Sedimentary evolution and persistence of open forests between the south-eastern Alpine fringe and the Northern Dinarides during the Last Glacial Maximum},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2015.06.025},
    volume = {436},
    year = {2015}
}
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