Text Messaging to Improve Preventive Health Attitudes and Behaviors During Pregnancy: A Prospective Cohort Analysis. Moniz, M., H.; Meyn, L., A.; and Beigi, R., H. The Journal of reproductive medicine, 60(9-10):378-382, 2015.
Text Messaging to Improve Preventive Health Attitudes and Behaviors During Pregnancy: A Prospective Cohort Analysis. [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
OBJECTIVE: To delineate the effects of text messages sent to pregnant women to promote preventive health beliefs and behaviors., STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort analysis was performed among women who participated in a randomized, controlled trial aimed at improving preventive health. Participants (158 pregnant women enrolled from 2010-2012) received 12 weekly text messages encouraging preventive health behaviors (tobacco cessation, condom use for disease prevention, nutrition optimization, seat belt use, breastfeeding). Pre- and postintervention surveys assessed preventive health beliefs and practices., RESULTS: At follow-up, participants agreed that receiving text messages changed their beliefs about targeted preventive health behaviors: smoking (50%), sexually transmitted disease prevention (72%), prenatal vitamins (83%), seat belt use (68%), nutritious foods (84%), and breastfeeding (68%). Many participants reported more frequent engagement in target behaviors at follow-up than at baseline: decreased tobacco use (among 41% of smokers), more consistent condom use (among 7% of sexually active participants), more prenatal vitamin intake (32%), more frequent seatbelt use (32%), more frequent healthy food intake (41%), and intention to breastfeed longer (21%)., CONCLUSION: Pregnant women receiving text messages promoting preventive health reported improvements in targeted beliefs and behaviors, suggesting that text messaging may be used for health promotion during pregnancy.
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 title = {Text Messaging to Improve Preventive Health Attitudes and Behaviors During Pregnancy: A Prospective Cohort Analysis.},
 type = {article},
 year = {2015},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {*Attitude to Health,*Health Behavior,*Pregnancy Complications/pc [Prevention & Control],*Text Messaging,Adult,Breast Feeding,Cohort Studies,Condoms/ut [Utilization],Female,Humans,Intention,Pregnancy,Prospective Studies,Seat Belts/ut [Utilization],Smoking Cessation,Smoking/th [Therapy],Vitamins/tu [Therapeutic Use],Young Adult},
 pages = {378-382},
 volume = {60},
 websites = {http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=reference&D=medl&NEWS=N&AN=26592061},
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 abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To delineate the effects of text messages sent to pregnant women to promote preventive health beliefs and behaviors., STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort analysis was performed among women who participated in a randomized, controlled trial aimed at improving preventive health. Participants (158 pregnant women enrolled from 2010-2012) received 12 weekly text messages encouraging preventive health behaviors (tobacco cessation, condom use for disease prevention, nutrition optimization, seat belt use, breastfeeding). Pre- and postintervention surveys assessed preventive health beliefs and practices., RESULTS: At follow-up, participants agreed that receiving text messages changed their beliefs about targeted preventive health behaviors: smoking (50%), sexually transmitted disease prevention (72%), prenatal vitamins (83%), seat belt use (68%), nutritious foods (84%), and breastfeeding (68%). Many participants reported more frequent engagement in target behaviors at follow-up than at baseline: decreased tobacco use (among 41% of smokers), more consistent condom use (among 7% of sexually active participants), more prenatal vitamin intake (32%), more frequent seatbelt use (32%), more frequent healthy food intake (41%), and intention to breastfeed longer (21%)., CONCLUSION: Pregnant women receiving text messages promoting preventive health reported improvements in targeted beliefs and behaviors, suggesting that text messaging may be used for health promotion during pregnancy.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Moniz, Michelle H and Meyn, Leslie A and Beigi, Richard H},
 journal = {The Journal of reproductive medicine},
 number = {9-10}
}
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