Lecture 3: Some Suggestions and Remarks upon Observing Children. Montessori, M. NAMTA Journal, 41(3):391–397, 2016.
Lecture 3: Some Suggestions and Remarks upon Observing Children [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
These next two lectures succinctly discuss the necessary preparation and methods for observation. Using the naturalist Fabre as an example of scientific training of the faculties for sharp observation, Montessori compares the observer to a researcher and gives many suggestions for conducting thorough yet unobtrusive observation. Self-awareness of the observer is essential for controlling distractions and maintaining the natural urge to assist (disturb), so that the natural behaviors of the child can be seen. Through practice, patience, and mastering one's own will, an observer will become "serene but strong, a person who knows how to dominate by her observation everything that occurs." Through a properly prepared environment and precise use of materials, concentrated attention and repeated movements that are driven by the inner impulses of the child will be produced and observed. Exact use of materials, including the "Pink Tower" and "Cylinder Block," is discussed in relation to producing inner organization and voluntary movements, which are important in the observation of precision. Lecture 11 discusses how the careful preparation of the observer, control of conditions, and precise use of materials will allow the child to "be free to manifest the phenomena which we wish to observe." [Reprinted paper presented at the "Observation: The Key to Unlocking the Child's Potential," North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) Conference, Part 3 (Denver, CO, November 5-8, 2015).]
@article{montessori_lecture_2016-5,
	title = {Lecture 3: {Some} {Suggestions} and {Remarks} upon {Observing} {Children}},
	volume = {41},
	issn = {1522-9734},
	url = {https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1125384},
	abstract = {These next two lectures succinctly discuss the necessary preparation and methods for observation. Using the naturalist Fabre as an example of scientific training of the faculties for sharp observation, Montessori compares the observer to a researcher and gives many suggestions for conducting thorough yet unobtrusive observation. Self-awareness of the observer is essential for controlling distractions and maintaining the natural urge to assist (disturb), so that the natural behaviors of the child can be seen. Through practice, patience, and mastering one's own will, an observer will become "serene but strong, a person who knows how to dominate by her observation everything that occurs." Through a properly prepared environment and precise use of materials, concentrated attention and repeated movements that are driven by the inner impulses of the child will be produced and observed. Exact use of materials, including the "Pink Tower" and "Cylinder Block," is discussed in relation to producing inner organization and voluntary movements, which are important in the observation of precision. Lecture 11 discusses how the careful preparation of the observer, control of conditions, and precise use of materials will allow the child to "be free to manifest the phenomena which we wish to observe." [Reprinted paper presented at the "Observation: The Key to Unlocking the Child's Potential," North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) Conference, Part 3 (Denver, CO, November 5-8, 2015).]},
	language = {eng},
	number = {3},
	journal = {NAMTA Journal},
	author = {Montessori, Maria},
	year = {2016},
	keywords = {Teacher Role, Observation, Children, Evaluation Methods, Self Actualization, Research Methodology},
	pages = {391--397}
}
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