Modelling olive trees and grapevines in a changing climate. Moriondo, M.; Ferrise, R.; Trombi, G.; Brilli, L.; Dibari, C.; and Bindi, M. Environmental Modelling & Software, 72:387–401, 2015.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
The models developed for simulating olive tree and grapevine yields were reviewed by focussing on the major limitations of these models for their application in a changing climate. Empirical models, which exploit the statistical relationship between climate and yield, and process based models, where crop behaviour is defined by a range of relationships describing the main plant processes, were considered. The results highlighted that the application of empirical models to future climatic conditions (i.e. future climate scenarios) is unreliable since important statistical approaches and predictors are still lacking. While process-based models have the potential for application in climate-change impact assessments, our analysis demonstrated how the simulation of many processes affected by warmer and CO2-enriched conditions may give rise to important biases. Conversely, some crop model improvements could be applied at this stage since specific sub-models accounting for the effect of elevated temperatures and CO2 concentration were already developed. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
@Article {Moriondo2015,
author = {Moriondo, M. and Ferrise, R. and Trombi, G. and Brilli, L. and Dibari, C. and Bindi, M.}, 
title = {Modelling olive trees and grapevines in a changing climate}, 
journal = {Environmental Modelling \& Software}, 
volume = {72}, 
pages = {387--401}, 
year = {2015}, 
doi = {10.1016/j.envsoft.2014.12.016}, 
abstract = {The models developed for simulating olive tree and grapevine yields were reviewed by focussing on the major limitations of these models for their application in a changing climate. Empirical models, which exploit the statistical relationship between climate and yield, and process based models, where crop behaviour is defined by a range of relationships describing the main plant processes, were considered. The results highlighted that the application of empirical models to future climatic conditions (i.e. future climate scenarios) is unreliable since important statistical approaches and predictors are still lacking. While process-based models have the potential for application in climate-change impact assessments, our analysis demonstrated how the simulation of many processes affected by warmer and CO2-enriched conditions may give rise to important biases. Conversely, some crop model improvements could be applied at this stage since specific sub-models accounting for the effect of elevated temperatures and CO2 concentration were already developed. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.}, 
note = { }, 
keywords = {tree crops; climate change; simulation models; crop yield; vitis-vinifera l.; air co2 enrichment; soil-water content; elevated co2; mediterranean basin; cropping systems; growth; yield; carbon; simulation}, 
type = {CropM}}
Downloads: 0