Chronic nitrogen additions fundamentally restructure the soil fungal community in a temperate forest. Morrison, E. W., Frey, S. D., Sadowsky, J. J., van Diepen, L. T. A., Thomas, W. K., & Pringle, A. Fungal Ecology, 23:48–57, October, 2016.
Chronic nitrogen additions fundamentally restructure the soil fungal community in a temperate forest [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Fungi dominate the microbial biomass of temperate forest soils and are a key driver of ecosystem nutrient cycling. Chronic nitrogen (N) amendments frequently cause the accumulation of soil organic matter within soils, suggesting that elevated N disrupts decomposition by altering fungal communities: To link previously observed increases in soil organic matter with potential changes in the fungal community, we assessed the effects of soil N amendment on fungal community structure at a long-term N addition experiment at Harvard Forest (Petersham, MA, USA). A decline in the relative abundance of ectomycorrhizal fungi following long-term N addition was offset by an increase in the relative abundance of saprotrophs. Species richness and diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi declined, while ascomycetes and saprotrophs responded positively to N enrichment. However, nitrophilic species included ectomycorrhizal as well as saprotrophic fungi, especially the ectomycorrhizal Russula vinacea, whose relative abundance increased from 10 to 37% of the entire community across N treatments. Two decades of soil N enrichment appears to have fundamentally altered the soil fungal community of this temperate forest. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd and British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.
@article{morrison_chronic_2016,
	title = {Chronic nitrogen additions fundamentally restructure the soil fungal community in a temperate forest},
	volume = {23},
	issn = {1754-5048},
	shorttitle = {Chronic nitrogen additions fundamentally restructure the soil fungal community in a temperate forest},
	url = {://WOS:000384786900006},
	doi = {10.1016/j.funeco.2016.05.011},
	abstract = {Fungi dominate the microbial biomass of temperate forest soils and are a key driver of ecosystem nutrient cycling. Chronic nitrogen (N) amendments frequently cause the accumulation of soil organic matter within soils, suggesting that elevated N disrupts decomposition by altering fungal communities: To link previously observed increases in soil organic matter with potential changes in the fungal community, we assessed the effects of soil N amendment on fungal community structure at a long-term N addition experiment at Harvard Forest (Petersham, MA, USA). A decline in the relative abundance of ectomycorrhizal fungi following long-term N addition was offset by an increase in the relative abundance of saprotrophs. Species richness and diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi declined, while ascomycetes and saprotrophs responded positively to N enrichment. However, nitrophilic species included ectomycorrhizal as well as saprotrophic fungi, especially the ectomycorrhizal Russula vinacea, whose relative abundance increased from 10 to 37\% of the entire community across N treatments. Two decades of soil N enrichment appears to have fundamentally altered the soil fungal community of this temperate forest. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd and British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.},
	language = {English},
	journal = {Fungal Ecology},
	author = {Morrison, E. W. and Frey, S. D. and Sadowsky, J. J. and van Diepen, L. T. A. and Thomas, W. K. and Pringle, A.},
	month = oct,
	year = {2016},
	keywords = {fungi, fertilization, Environmental Sciences \& Ecology, decomposition, litter, abundance, microbial communities, identification, mycorrhizal fungi, Ascomycetes, atmospheric no3-deposition, Basidiomycetes, Community, Diversity, DNA barcoding, ectomycorrhizal, Mycology, Nitrogen deposition, northern hardwood forests, organic-matter, Soil fungi},
	pages = {48--57}
}
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