Evaluating the capabilities model of dementia care: a non-randomized controlled trial exploring resident quality of life and care staff attitudes and experiences. Moyle, W., Venturato, L., Cooke, M., Murfield, J., Griffiths, S., Hughes, J., & Wolf, N. International psychogeriatrics / IPA, 3, 2016.
abstract   bibtex   
BACKGROUND: This 12 month, Australian study sought to compare the Capabilities Model of Dementia Care (CMDC) with usual long-term care (LTC), in terms of (1) the effectiveness of the CMDC in assisting care staff to improve Quality Of Life (QOL) for older people with dementia; and (2) whether implementation of the CMDC improved staff attitudes towards, and experiences of working and caring for the person with dementia. METHODS: A single blind, non-randomized controlled trial design, involving CMDC intervention group (three facilities) and a comparison usual LTC practice control group (one facility), was conducted from August 2010 to September 2011. Eighty-one staff members and 48 family members of a person with dementia were recruited from these four LTC facilities. At baseline, 6 and 12 months, staff completed a modified Staff Experiences of Working with Demented Residents questionnaire (SEWDR), and families completed the Quality of Life - Alzheimer's Disease questionnaire (QOL-AD). RESULTS: LTC staff in the usual care group reported significantly lower SEWDR scores (i.e. less work satisfaction) than those in the CMDC intervention group at 12 months (p = 0.005). Similarly, family members in the comparison group reported significantly lower levels of perceived QOL for their relative with dementia (QOL-AD scores) than their counterparts in the CMDC intervention group at 12 months (p = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: Although the study has a number of limitations the CMDC appears to be an effective model of dementia care - more so than usual LTC practice. The CMDC requires further evaluation with participants from a diverse range of LTC facilities and stages of cognitive impairment.
@article{
 title = {Evaluating the capabilities model of dementia care: a non-randomized controlled trial exploring resident quality of life and care staff attitudes and experiences},
 type = {article},
 year = {2016},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {dementia,long-term care,nursing care management,nursing models,quality of life,quantitative evaluation,work satisfaction},
 pages = {1-10},
 month = {3},
 day = {10},
 city = {School of Nursing & Midwifery,Centre for Health Practice Innovation,Menzies Health Institute Queensland,Griffith University,Nathan,Brisbane,Queensland,Australia.; Faculty of Nursing,University of Calgary,Calgary,Canada.; School of Nursing & Midwifery,Cent},
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 notes = {LR: 20160311; JID: 9007918; OTO: NOTNLM; aheadofprint; SO: Int Psychogeriatr. 2016 Mar 10:1-10.},
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 abstract = {BACKGROUND: This 12 month, Australian study sought to compare the Capabilities Model of Dementia Care (CMDC) with usual long-term care (LTC), in terms of (1) the effectiveness of the CMDC in assisting care staff to improve Quality Of Life (QOL) for older people with dementia; and (2) whether implementation of the CMDC improved staff attitudes towards, and experiences of working and caring for the person with dementia. METHODS: A single blind, non-randomized controlled trial design, involving CMDC intervention group (three facilities) and a comparison usual LTC practice control group (one facility), was conducted from August 2010 to September 2011. Eighty-one staff members and 48 family members of a person with dementia were recruited from these four LTC facilities. At baseline, 6 and 12 months, staff completed a modified Staff Experiences of Working with Demented Residents questionnaire (SEWDR), and families completed the Quality of Life - Alzheimer's Disease questionnaire (QOL-AD). RESULTS: LTC staff in the usual care group reported significantly lower SEWDR scores (i.e. less work satisfaction) than those in the CMDC intervention group at 12 months (p = 0.005). Similarly, family members in the comparison group reported significantly lower levels of perceived QOL for their relative with dementia (QOL-AD scores) than their counterparts in the CMDC intervention group at 12 months (p = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: Although the study has a number of limitations the CMDC appears to be an effective model of dementia care - more so than usual LTC practice. The CMDC requires further evaluation with participants from a diverse range of LTC facilities and stages of cognitive impairment.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Moyle, W and Venturato, L and Cooke, M and Murfield, J and Griffiths, S and Hughes, J and Wolf, N},
 journal = {International psychogeriatrics / IPA}
}
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