Security Compliance in Agile Software Development: A Systematic Mapping Study. Moyon, F.; Almeida, P.; Riofrio, D.; Mendez, D.; and Kalinowski, M. In 46th Euromicro Conference on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications, SEAA 2020, Portoroz, Slovenia, Aug 26-28, pages 413-420, 2020.
Security Compliance in Agile Software Development: A Systematic Mapping Study [pdf]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   3 downloads  
[Context] Systematic Literature Reviews (SLRs) have been adopted within the Software Engineering (SE) domain for more than a decade to provide meaningful summaries of evidence on several topics. Many of these SLRs are now outdated, and there are no standard proposals on how to update SLRs in SE. [Objective] The goal of this paper is to provide recommendations on how to best to search for evidence when updating SLRs in SE. [Method] To achieve our goal, we compare and discuss outcomes from applying different search strategies to identifying primary studies in a previously published SLR update on effort estimation. [Results] The use of a single iteration forward snowballing with Google Scholar, and employing the original SLR and its primary studies as a seed set seems to be the most cost-effective way to search for new evidence when updating SLRs. [Conclusions] The recommendations can be used to support decisions on how to update SLRs in SE.
@inproceedings{MoyonARMK20,
  author    = {Fabiola Moyon and Pamela Almeida and Daniel Riofrio and Daniel Mendez and Marcos Kalinowski},
  title     = {Security Compliance in Agile Software Development: A Systematic Mapping Study},
  abstract  = {[Context] Systematic Literature Reviews (SLRs) have been adopted within the Software Engineering (SE) domain for more than a decade to provide meaningful summaries of evidence on several topics. Many of these SLRs are now outdated, and there are no standard proposals on how to update SLRs in SE. [Objective] The goal of this paper is to provide recommendations on how to best to search for  evidence when updating SLRs in SE. [Method] To achieve our goal, we compare and discuss outcomes from applying different search strategies to identifying primary studies in a previously published SLR update on effort estimation. [Results] The use of a single iteration forward snowballing with Google Scholar, and employing the original SLR and its primary studies as a seed set seems to be the most cost-effective way to search for new evidence when updating SLRs. [Conclusions] The recommendations can be used to support decisions on how to update SLRs in SE.},
  booktitle = {46th Euromicro Conference on Software Engineering and Advanced Applications, {SEAA} 2020, Portoroz, Slovenia, Aug 26-28},
  pages     = {413-420},
  note      = {},
  year      = {2020},
  url       = {./publications/MoyonARMK20.pdf},
  doi       = {10.1109/SEAA51224.2020.00073},
}
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