Assembly of Active Bacterial and Fungal Communities Along a Natural Environmental Gradient. Mueller, R. C., Gallegos-Graves, L., Zak, D. R., & Kuske, C. R. Microbial Ecology, 71(1):57–67, January, 2016.
Assembly of Active Bacterial and Fungal Communities Along a Natural Environmental Gradient [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Dormancy is thought to promote biodiversity within microbial communities, but how assembly of the active community responds to changes in environmental conditions is unclear. To measure the active and dormant communities of bacteria and fungi colonizing decomposing litter in maple forests, we targeted ribosomal genes and transcripts across a natural environmental gradient. Within bacterial and fungal communities, the active and dormant communities were phylogenetically distinct, but patterns of phylogenetic clustering varied. For bacteria, active communities were significantly more clustered than dormant communities, while the reverse was found for fungi. The proportion of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) classified as active and the degree of phylogenetic clustering of the active bacterial communities declined with increasing pH and decreasing C/N. No significant correlations were found for the fungal community. The opposing pattern of phylogenetic clustering in dormant and active communities and the differential response of active communities to environmental gradients suggest that dormancy differentially structures bacterial and fungal communities.
@article{mueller_assembly_2016,
	title = {Assembly of {Active} {Bacterial} and {Fungal} {Communities} {Along} a {Natural} {Environmental} {Gradient}},
	volume = {71},
	issn = {0095-3628},
	shorttitle = {Assembly of {Active} {Bacterial} and {Fungal} {Communities} {Along} a {Natural} {Environmental} {Gradient}},
	url = {://WOS:000367097500007},
	doi = {10.1007/s00248-015-0655-y},
	abstract = {Dormancy is thought to promote biodiversity within microbial communities, but how assembly of the active community responds to changes in environmental conditions is unclear. To measure the active and dormant communities of bacteria and fungi colonizing decomposing litter in maple forests, we targeted ribosomal genes and transcripts across a natural environmental gradient. Within bacterial and fungal communities, the active and dormant communities were phylogenetically distinct, but patterns of phylogenetic clustering varied. For bacteria, active communities were significantly more clustered than dormant communities, while the reverse was found for fungi. The proportion of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) classified as active and the degree of phylogenetic clustering of the active bacterial communities declined with increasing pH and decreasing C/N. No significant correlations were found for the fungal community. The opposing pattern of phylogenetic clustering in dormant and active communities and the differential response of active communities to environmental gradients suggest that dormancy differentially structures bacterial and fungal communities.},
	number = {1},
	journal = {Microbial Ecology},
	author = {Mueller, Rebecca C. and Gallegos-Graves, Laverne and Zak, Donald R. and Kuske, Cheryl R.},
	month = jan,
	year = {2016},
	pages = {57--67}
}
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