Islanding the power grid on the transmission level: less connections for more security. Mureddu, M., Caldarelli, G., Damiano, A., Scala, A., & Meyer-Ortmanns, H. Scientific Reports, 6:34797, Nature Publishing Group, 2016.
Islanding the power grid on the transmission level: less connections for more security [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Islanding is known as a management procedure of the power system that is implemented at the distribution level to preserve sensible loads from outages and to guarantee the continuity in electricity supply, when a high amount of distributed generation occurs. In this paper we study islanding on the level of the transmission grid and shall show that it is a suitable measure to enhance energy security and grid resilience. We consider the German and Italian transmission grids. We remove links either randomly to mimic random failure events, or according to a topological characteristic, their so-called betweenness centrality, to mimic an intentional attack and test whether the resulting fragments are self-sustainable. We test this option via the tool of optimized DC power flow equations. When transmission lines are removed according to their betweenness centrality, the resulting islands have a higher chance of being dynamically self-sustainable than for a random removal. Less connections may even increase the grid's stability. These facts should be taken into account in the design of future power grids.
@article{mureddu2016islanding,
abstract = {Islanding is known as a management procedure of the power system that is implemented at the distribution level to preserve sensible loads from outages and to guarantee the continuity in electricity supply, when a high amount of distributed generation occurs. In this paper we study islanding on the level of the transmission grid and shall show that it is a suitable measure to enhance energy security and grid resilience. We consider the German and Italian transmission grids. We remove links either randomly to mimic random failure events, or according to a topological characteristic, their so-called betweenness centrality, to mimic an intentional attack and test whether the resulting fragments are self-sustainable. We test this option via the tool of optimized DC power flow equations. When transmission lines are removed according to their betweenness centrality, the resulting islands have a higher chance of being dynamically self-sustainable than for a random removal. Less connections may even increase the grid's stability. These facts should be taken into account in the design of future power grids.},
author = {Mureddu, Mario and Caldarelli, Guido and Damiano, Alfonso and Scala, Antonio and Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard},
doi = {10.1038/srep34797},
issn = {2045-2322},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
keywords = {DOLFINS{\_}T3.4,DOLFINS{\_}WP3},
mendeley-tags = {DOLFINS{\_}T3.4,DOLFINS{\_}WP3},
pages = {34797},
publisher = {Nature Publishing Group},
title = {{Islanding the power grid on the transmission level: less connections for more security}},
url = {http://www.nature.com/articles/srep34797},
volume = {6},
year = {2016}
}
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