The Effects of Cumulative Victimization on Mental Health Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Adolescents and Young Adults. Mustanski, B., Andrews, R., & Puckett, J. A Am. J. Public Health, 106(3):527--533, March, 2016. 00000
The Effects of Cumulative Victimization on Mental Health Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Adolescents and Young Adults [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of the cumulative victimization experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youths on mental disorders. METHODS: We recruited 248 participants from the Chicago, Illinois, area in 7 waves of data collected over 4 years, beginning in 2007 (83.1% retention rate). Mean age at enrollment was 18.7 years, and 54.7% were Black. We measured depression and posttraumatic stress disorder using structured psychiatric interviews. RESULTS: Latent class analyses of victimization over time identified a 4-class solution. Class 1 (65.4%) had low, decreasing victimization. Class 2 (10.3%) had moderate, increasing victimization. Class 3 (5.1%) had high, steady victimization. Class 4 (19.2%) had high, decreasing victimization. Controlling for baseline diagnoses and birth sex, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youths in classes 2 and 3 were at higher risk for depression than were those in class 1; youths in classes 2, 3, and 4 were at elevated risk for posttraumatic stress disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youths with steadily high or increasing levels of victimization from adolescence to early adulthood are at higher risk for depression and posttraumatic stress disorder.
@article{mustanski_effects_2016,
	title = {The {Effects} of {Cumulative} {Victimization} on {Mental} {Health} {Among} {Lesbian}, {Gay}, {Bisexual}, and {Transgender} {Adolescents} and {Young} {Adults}},
	volume = {106},
	issn = {0090-0036},
	url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2015.302976},
	doi = {10.2105/AJPH.2015.302976},
	abstract = {OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of the cumulative victimization
experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youths on mental
disorders. METHODS: We recruited 248 participants from the Chicago,
Illinois, area in 7 waves of data collected over 4 years, beginning in
2007 (83.1\% retention rate). Mean age at enrollment was 18.7 years, and
54.7\% were Black. We measured depression and posttraumatic stress disorder
using structured psychiatric interviews. RESULTS: Latent class analyses of
victimization over time identified a 4-class solution. Class 1 (65.4\%) had
low, decreasing victimization. Class 2 (10.3\%) had moderate, increasing
victimization. Class 3 (5.1\%) had high, steady victimization. Class 4
(19.2\%) had high, decreasing victimization. Controlling for baseline
diagnoses and birth sex, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youths in
classes 2 and 3 were at higher risk for depression than were those in
class 1; youths in classes 2, 3, and 4 were at elevated risk for
posttraumatic stress disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and
transgender youths with steadily high or increasing levels of
victimization from adolescence to early adulthood are at higher risk for
depression and posttraumatic stress disorder.},
	number = {3},
	journal = {Am. J. Public Health},
	author = {Mustanski, Brian and Andrews, Rebecca and Puckett, Jae A},
	month = mar,
	year = {2016},
	note = {00000},
	keywords = {Sep 20 import, duplicate},
	pages = {527--533}
}
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