Standardisation of oxygen exposure in the development of mouse models for bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Nardiello C., Mizkova I., Silva D.M., Ruiz-Camp J., Mayer K., Vadasz I., Herold S., Seeger W., & Morty R.E. 2017.
Standardisation of oxygen exposure in the development of mouse models for bronchopulmonary dysplasia [pdf]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Progress in developing new therapies for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is sometimes complicated by the lack of a standardised animal model. Our objective was to develop a robust hyperoxia-based mouse model of BPD that recapitulated the pathological perturbations to lung structure noted in infants with BPD. Newborn mouse pups were exposed to a varying fraction of oxygen in the inspired air (FiO2) and a varying window of hyperoxia exposure, after which lung structure was assessed by design-based stereology with systemic uniform random sampling. The efficacy of a candidate therapeutic intervention using parenteral nutrition was evaluated to demonstrate the utility of the standardised BPDmodel for drug discovery. An FiO2 of 0.85 for the first 14 days of life decreased total alveoli number and concomitantly increased alveolar septal wall thickness, which are two key histopathological characteristics of BPD. A reduction in FiO2 to 0.60 or 0.40 also caused a decrease in the total alveoli number, but the septal wall thickness was not impacted. Neither a decreasing oxygen gradient (from FiO2 0.85 to 0.21 over the first 14 days of life) nor an oscillation in FiO2 (between 0.85 and 0.40 on a 24 h:24 h cycle) had an appreciable impact on lung development. The risk ofmissing beneficial effects of therapeutic interventions at FiO2 0.85, using parenteral nutrition as an intervention in the model, was also noted, highlighting the utility of lower FiO2 in selected studies, and underscoring the need to tailor the model employed to the experimental intervention. Thus, a state-of-the-art BPD animal model that recapitulates the two histopathological hallmark perturbations to lung architecture associated with BPD is described. The model presented here, where injurious stimuli have been systematically evaluated, provides a most promising approach for the development of new strategies to drive postnatal lung maturation in affected infants. Copyright © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
@misc{nardiello_c._standardisation_2017,
	title = {Standardisation of oxygen exposure in the development of mouse models for bronchopulmonary dysplasia},
	url = {http://dmm.biologists.org/content/dmm/10/2/185.full.pdf},
	abstract = {Progress in developing new therapies for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is sometimes complicated by the lack of a standardised animal model. Our objective was to develop a robust hyperoxia-based mouse model of BPD that recapitulated the pathological perturbations to lung structure noted in infants with BPD. Newborn mouse pups were exposed to a varying fraction of oxygen in the inspired air (FiO2) and a varying window of hyperoxia exposure, after which lung structure was assessed by design-based stereology with systemic uniform random sampling. The efficacy of a candidate therapeutic intervention using parenteral nutrition was evaluated to demonstrate the utility of the standardised BPDmodel for drug discovery. An FiO2 of 0.85 for the first 14 days of life decreased total alveoli number and concomitantly increased alveolar septal wall thickness, which are two key histopathological characteristics of BPD. A reduction in FiO2 to 0.60 or 0.40 also caused a decrease in the total alveoli number, but the septal wall thickness was not impacted. Neither a decreasing oxygen gradient (from FiO2 0.85 to 0.21 over the first 14 days of life) nor an oscillation in FiO2 (between 0.85 and 0.40 on a 24 h:24 h cycle) had an appreciable impact on lung development. The risk ofmissing beneficial effects of therapeutic interventions at FiO2 0.85, using parenteral nutrition as an intervention in the model, was also noted, highlighting the utility of lower FiO2 in selected studies, and underscoring the need to tailor the model employed to the experimental intervention. Thus, a state-of-the-art BPD animal model that recapitulates the two histopathological hallmark perturbations to lung architecture associated with BPD is described. The model presented here, where injurious stimuli have been systematically evaluated, provides a most promising approach for the development of new strategies to drive postnatal lung maturation in affected infants. Copyright © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.},
	journal = {DMM Disease Models and Mechanisms},
	author = {{Nardiello C.} and {Mizkova I.} and {Silva D.M.} and {Ruiz-Camp J.} and {Mayer K.} and {Vadasz I.} and {Herold S.} and {Seeger W.} and {Morty R.E.}},
	year = {2017},
	keywords = {*exposure, *hyperoxia, *lung development, *lung dysplasia, *lung dysplasia/et [Etiology], *mouse model, *oxygen, Parenteral nutrition, animal experiment, animal model, article, controlled study, cotton seed oil, disease model, experimental model, fetus lung maturation, gas exchange, histopathology, hyperoxia, infant, lung alveolus wall, lung development, lung structure, mouse, newborn, nonhuman, oscillation, oxygen concentration, priority journal, sampling, stereology, stimulus, thickness}
}
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