Cardiovascular Benefits of Nuts. Nash, S. D. & Westpfal, M. 95(8):963–965.
Cardiovascular Benefits of Nuts [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Extract: Walnuts and almonds have been extensively studied. Sabate et al12 randomly assigned 18 healthy men to follow a National Cholesterol Education Program Step I diet (reference diet) for 4 weeks. Fifty percent of the men derived 20\,% of their calories from walnuts (the walnut diet). Compared with those following the reference diet, the group on the walnut diet had significantly lower levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. Despite the decreased HDL cholesterol on the walnut diet, the ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol was significantly lower on the walnut diet (p $<$0.001).13 In a randomized crossover feeding trial, 55 adults who had hypercholesteremia (mean age 56 years) followed a cholesterol-lowering Mediterranean diet or a similar diet in which walnuts replaced ∼35\,% of the energy derived from monounsaturated fat. Compared with the reference Mediterranean diet, the walnut diet resulted in statistically significant decreases in total and LDL cholesterol levels (in men and women) and lipoprotein(a) levels (men only; no change in women).14 In a smaller study of healthy volunteers, the walnut diet resulted in significantly lower total cholesterol levels and ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol compared with the reference diet in men and women (p ≤0.05). LDL cholesterol was significantly lower in women who followed the walnut diet (p = 0.0008) and trended lower in men but did not achieve statistical significance (p = 0.078).14 Almario et al15 studied the effects of walnut consumption on lipoprotein subclasses. They found that walnut supplementation decreased cholesterol preferentially in the more atherogenic, small, and dense LDLs.
@article{nashCardiovascularBenefitsNuts2005,
  title = {Cardiovascular Benefits of Nuts},
  author = {Nash, Stephen D. and Westpfal, Matthew},
  date = {2005},
  journaltitle = {The American Journal of Cardiology},
  volume = {95},
  pages = {963--965},
  doi = {10.1016/j.amjcard.2004.12.035},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2004.12.035},
  abstract = {Extract: Walnuts and almonds have been extensively studied. Sabate et al12 randomly assigned 18 healthy men to follow a National Cholesterol Education Program Step I diet (reference diet) for 4 weeks. Fifty percent of the men derived 20\,\% of their calories from walnuts (the walnut diet). Compared with those following the reference diet, the group on the walnut diet had significantly lower levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. Despite the decreased HDL cholesterol on the walnut diet, the ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol was significantly lower on the walnut diet (p {$<$}0.001).13

In a randomized crossover feeding trial, 55 adults who had hypercholesteremia (mean age 56 years) followed a cholesterol-lowering Mediterranean diet or a similar diet in which walnuts replaced ∼35\,\% of the energy derived from monounsaturated fat. Compared with the reference Mediterranean diet, the walnut diet resulted in statistically significant decreases in total and LDL cholesterol levels (in men and women) and lipoprotein(a) levels (men only; no change in women).14 In a smaller study of healthy volunteers, the walnut diet resulted in significantly lower total cholesterol levels and ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol compared with the reference diet in men and women (p ≤0.05). LDL cholesterol was significantly lower in women who followed the walnut diet (p = 0.0008) and trended lower in men but did not achieve statistical significance (p = 0.078).14 Almario et al15 studied the effects of walnut consumption on lipoprotein subclasses. They found that walnut supplementation decreased cholesterol preferentially in the more atherogenic, small, and dense LDLs.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13576298,~to-add-doi-URL,cardiovascular-benefit,walnut},
  number = {8}
}
Downloads: 0