Out of Africa. Nature 514(7521):139.
Out of Africa [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
The Ebola outbreak in West Africa must be shut down now, or the disease will continue to spread. [Excerpt] Ebola is out of control in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. Although this has been the case since late spring, the international pledges of help have yet to translate into concerted, rapid action on the ground. The virus still has the upper hand. Between 23 September and 1 October alone, the number of cases rose from 6,500 to almost 7,500, according to the World Health Organization. The situation has become so bad that no one knows the true numbers of cases and deaths, only that they are probably much larger than official estimates. And the accompanying collapse of the countries' health systems means that people are unnecessarily falling victim to malaria and other diseases. One does not need a mathematical model to foresee how bad this could get. [...] The world is fiddling as West Africa burns, and unless it acts much faster, the outbreak risks spreading to surrounding regions. Sparks from it could lead to exports to more far-flung places, perhaps even to major cities that lack decent public-health infrastructure. But countries and the public must also realize that although action is needed urgently, the commitments must be sustained until the outbreak has been stamped out, which could take many months. The relatively low threat to developed countries must not distract or detract from the pressing need to tackle the outbreak at its source.
@article{natureOutAfrica2014,
  title = {Out of {{Africa}}},
  author = {{Nature}},
  date = {2014-10},
  journaltitle = {Nature},
  volume = {514},
  pages = {139},
  issn = {0028-0836},
  doi = {10.1038/514139a},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1038/514139a},
  abstract = {The Ebola outbreak in West Africa must be shut down now, or the disease will continue to spread. [Excerpt] Ebola is out of control in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. Although this has been the case since late spring, the international pledges of help have yet to translate into concerted, rapid action on the ground. The virus still has the upper hand. Between 23 September and 1 October alone, the number of cases rose from 6,500 to almost 7,500, according to the World Health Organization. The situation has become so bad that no one knows the true numbers of cases and deaths, only that they are probably much larger than official estimates. And the accompanying collapse of the countries' health systems means that people are unnecessarily falling victim to malaria and other diseases. One does not need a mathematical model to foresee how bad this could get. [...] The world is fiddling as West Africa burns, and unless it acts much faster, the outbreak risks spreading to surrounding regions. Sparks from it could lead to exports to more far-flung places, perhaps even to major cities that lack decent public-health infrastructure. But countries and the public must also realize that although action is needed urgently, the commitments must be sustained until the outbreak has been stamped out, which could take many months. The relatively low threat to developed countries must not distract or detract from the pressing need to tackle the outbreak at its source.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13387304,cognitive-biases,connectivity,decision-making,disasters,emergency-events,feedback,global-scale,human-health,inequality,mitigation,non-linearity,outbreaks,science-policy-interface,science-society-interface,spatial-spread},
  number = {7521}
}
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