Share Alike. Nature 507(7491):140.
Share Alike [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Research communities need to agree on standard etiquette for data-sharing. [Excerpt] In many fields, making research data available online for all is a step beyond making research papers open-access. This might puzzle communities that have already agreed to share. [...] Communities need to debate the ethics of data-sharing and agree on etiquette. When a researcher relies on another's data, for example, it should be standard practice to invite the data-providers to be co-authors. Ecologists Clifford Duke and John Porter have suggested guidelines for deciding whether to extend such an invitation (C. S. Duke and J. H. Porter BioScience 63, 483-489; 2013); these include noting whether the data are integral to the new analysis, whether the data are unique or particularly novel, and whether the data-provider can fully participate in manuscript-writing by approving draft and final versions. Another ecologist, Dominique Roche, has urged disclosure of data reuse, and better communication between data generators and reusers (D. G. Roche et al. PLoS Biol. 12, e1001779; 2014). [...]
@article{natureShareAlike2014,
  title = {Share Alike},
  author = {{Nature}},
  date = {2014-03},
  journaltitle = {Nature},
  volume = {507},
  pages = {140},
  issn = {0028-0836},
  doi = {10.1038/507140a},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1038/507140a},
  abstract = {Research communities need to agree on standard etiquette for data-sharing.

[Excerpt] In many fields, making research data available online for all is a step beyond making research papers open-access. This might puzzle communities that have already agreed to share. [...] Communities need to debate the ethics of data-sharing and agree on etiquette. When a researcher relies on another's data, for example, it should be standard practice to invite the data-providers to be co-authors. Ecologists Clifford Duke and John Porter have suggested guidelines for deciding whether to extend such an invitation (C. S. Duke and J. H. Porter BioScience 63, 483-489; 2013); these include noting whether the data are integral to the new analysis, whether the data are unique or particularly novel, and whether the data-provider can fully participate in manuscript-writing by approving draft and final versions. Another ecologist, Dominique Roche, has urged disclosure of data reuse, and better communication between data generators and reusers (D. G. Roche et al. PLoS Biol. 12, e1001779; 2014). [...]},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13105642,data-sharing,editorial,free-scientific-knowledge,open-data,reproducible-research,science-ethics,scientific-communication,scientific-knowledge-sharing},
  number = {7491}
}
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