Social Software. Nature Methods 4(3):189.
Social Software [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Software that is custom-developed as part of novel methods is as important for the method's implementation as reagents and protocols. Such software, or the underlying algorithms, must be made available to readers upon publication. [Excerpt] "An inherent principle of publication is that others should be able to replicate and build upon the authors' published claims. Therefore, a condition of publication in a Nature journal is that authors are required to make materials, data and associated protocols available to readers promptly on request." This excerpt from our guide to authors may seem obvious, but judging from the number of discussions we have had with authors and referees, we would like to clarify one specific point: at Nature Methods, the definition of "materials, data and associated protocols" includes custom-designed software necessary for the method's implementation. Yet there are several ways of making software available, with various degrees of disclosure and in a choice of formats. [] [...] Any restrictions to a program's accessibility must be specified at the time of submission, and editors will consider the amount of information made available, case by case, in consultation with the reviewers. If some restrictions are deemed acceptable, they must be clearly explained in the methods section. This condition – it may be useful to reiterate – applies for reagents as well. Also, the possibility to reach an agreement on restricted distribution does not obviate the need to provide, during confidential peer review, all programming details deemed necessary by the reviewers to evaluate the method. [] [...] In sum, the goal of publishing a methods paper should be to see this method adopted by the widest possible relevant community of researchers. Therefore, like other materials, the algorithmic components that constitute integral parts of new methods must be made available and in a format that will facilitate the method's adoption. [] [...]
@article{naturemethodsSocialSoftware2007,
  title = {Social Software},
  author = {{Nature Methods}},
  date = {2007-03},
  journaltitle = {Nature Methods},
  volume = {4},
  pages = {189},
  issn = {1548-7091},
  doi = {10.1038/nmeth0307-189},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1038/nmeth0307-189},
  abstract = {Software that is custom-developed as part of novel methods is as important for the method's implementation as reagents and protocols. Such software, or the underlying algorithms, must be made available to readers upon publication.

[Excerpt] "An inherent principle of publication is that others should be able to replicate and build upon the authors' published claims. Therefore, a condition of publication in a Nature journal is that authors are required to make materials, data and associated protocols available to readers promptly on request." This excerpt from our guide to authors may seem obvious, but judging from the number of discussions we have had with authors and referees, we would like to clarify one specific point: at Nature Methods, the definition of "materials, data and associated protocols" includes custom-designed software necessary for the method's implementation. Yet there are several ways of making software available, with various degrees of disclosure and in a choice of formats.

[] [...]

Any restrictions to a program's accessibility must be specified at the time of submission, and editors will consider the amount of information made available, case by case, in consultation with the reviewers. If some restrictions are deemed acceptable, they must be clearly explained in the methods section. This condition -- it may be useful to reiterate -- applies for reagents as well. Also, the possibility to reach an agreement on restricted distribution does not obviate the need to provide, during confidential peer review, all programming details deemed necessary by the reviewers to evaluate the method.

[] [...]

In sum, the goal of publishing a methods paper should be to see this method adopted by the widest possible relevant community of researchers. Therefore, like other materials, the algorithmic components that constitute integral parts of new methods must be made available and in a format that will facilitate the method's adoption.

[] [...]},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-2063779,~to-add-doi-URL,algorithms,free-scientific-knowledge,free-software,open-science,reproducibility,reproducible-research,scientific-knowledge-sharing,transparency},
  number = {3}
}
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