Crowdsourcing Microclimate, Personal Thermal Comfort and Heat Stress, and Physiological Responses using Wearable Devices. Nazarian, N., Miller, C., Martilli, A., & Norford, L. K.
Crowdsourcing Microclimate, Personal Thermal Comfort and Heat Stress, and Physiological Responses using Wearable Devices [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
As climate change accelerates, obtaining accurate and comprehensive data on microclimate and thermal stress in cities is crucial for constructing adaptation and mitigation strategies. The information gathered using the conventional methods of data measurements (such as surveys of pedestrians and point measurements of microclimate data) contributes significantly to our knowledge of thermal comfort, but several limitations persist: measurements are scattered in time and space. Accordingly, the spatial and temporal distributions of microclimate parameters are not available through the experiments and can only be achieved by employing numerical modeling; and data gathered on outdoor thermal stress and comfort do not include physiological parameters that correspond to the thermal stress of individuals. Accordingly, it is not yet clear which of the microclimate, physiological, and/or psychological parameters most strongly correlate with thermal stresses and how this factor affects human activities in urban outdoor spaces. To address these shortcomings, we propose to extend the measurements of microclimate parameters to an emerging method of obtaining data: crowdsourcing. Accordingly, we employ wearables for the monitoring of personal physiological responses of comfort and stress that span a wide range of spatial and temporal distributions. The main objective of this study is to address the feasibility of such methodology and evaluate the link between microclimate parameters and physiological responses. Accordingly, working together with the Fitbit research team, we modified a number of wearable devices such that they record 1) microclimate parameters (such as air temperature) and 2) physiological parameters (body core temperature and skin temperature) that most correlate with human thermal comfort, heat stress, and individuals’ performance. To evaluate the validity of measurements using wearable devices, we employ portable environmental devices for evaluation of microclimate data; gastrointestinal pills for the validation of calculated body core temperature; and subjective user feedback for comparison with the estimation of thermal comfort from skin temperature. Additionally, we perform a multivariate statistical analysis that evaluates the correlation between physiological response and thermal comfort and stress. The ultimate impacts of this study are a) enabling data-gathering on climate at a large scale with less centralized efforts and resources, and b) providing insights on the link between climate and activity level and health, which is important for maintaining the livability of our future cities. These impacts directly influence the way we understand and design for thermal comfort, and can ultimately provide information to address individuals’ response in case of extreme heat events. Lastly, this project could serves as a pilot study for a larger-scale effort involving thousands of participants across various cities.
@misc{nazarian_crowdsourcing_nodate,
	title = {Crowdsourcing {Microclimate}, {Personal} {Thermal} {Comfort} and {Heat} {Stress}, and {Physiological} {Responses} using {Wearable} {Devices}},
	url = {https://ams.confex.com/ams/ICUC10/meetingapp.cgi},
	abstract = {As climate change accelerates, obtaining accurate and comprehensive data on microclimate and thermal stress in cities is crucial for constructing adaptation and mitigation strategies. The information gathered using the conventional methods of data measurements (such as surveys of pedestrians and point measurements of microclimate data) contributes significantly to our knowledge of thermal comfort, but several limitations persist:
measurements are scattered in time and space. Accordingly, the spatial and temporal distributions of microclimate parameters are not available through the experiments and can only be achieved by employing numerical modeling; and
data gathered on outdoor thermal stress and comfort do not include physiological parameters that correspond to the thermal stress of individuals. Accordingly, it is not yet clear which of the microclimate, physiological, and/or psychological parameters most strongly correlate with thermal stresses and how this factor affects human activities in urban outdoor spaces.
To address these shortcomings, we propose to extend the measurements of microclimate parameters to an emerging method of obtaining data: crowdsourcing. Accordingly, we employ wearables for the monitoring of personal physiological responses of comfort and stress that span a wide range of spatial and temporal distributions.

The main objective of this study is to address the feasibility of such methodology and evaluate the link between microclimate parameters and physiological responses. Accordingly, working together with the Fitbit research team, we modified a number of wearable devices such that they record 1) microclimate parameters (such as air temperature) and 2) physiological parameters (body core temperature and skin temperature) that most correlate with human thermal comfort, heat stress, and individuals’ performance. To evaluate the validity of measurements using wearable devices, we employ portable environmental devices for evaluation of microclimate data; gastrointestinal pills for the validation of calculated body core temperature; and subjective user feedback for comparison with the estimation of thermal comfort from skin temperature. Additionally, we perform a multivariate statistical analysis that evaluates the correlation between physiological response and thermal comfort and stress.

The ultimate impacts of this study are a) enabling data-gathering on climate at a large scale with less centralized efforts and resources, and b) providing insights on the link between climate and activity level and health, which is important for maintaining the livability of our future cities. These impacts directly influence the way we understand and design for thermal comfort, and can ultimately provide information to address individuals’ response in case of extreme heat events. Lastly, this project could serves as a pilot study for a larger-scale effort involving thousands of participants across various cities.},
	urldate = {2018-11-05},
	journal = {AMS - 10th International Conference on Urban Climate/14th Symposium on the Urban Environment},
	author = {Nazarian, Negin and Miller, Clayton and Martilli, Alberto and Norford, Leslie K.},
}
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