Water stress induced breakdown of carbon-water relations: indicators from diurnal FLUXNET patterns. Nelson, J., A., Carvalhais, N., Migliavacca, M., Reichstein, M., & Jung, M. Biogeosciences Discussions, 19(October):1-19, 2017.
Water stress induced breakdown of carbon-water relations: indicators from diurnal FLUXNET patterns [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Understanding of terrestrial carbon and water cycles is currently hampered by an uncertainty in how to capture the large variety of plant responses to drought across climates, ecological strategies, and environments. In FLUXNET, the global network of CO2 and H2O flux observations, many sites do not uniformly report the ancillary variables needed to study drought response physiology such as soil moisture, sap flux, or species composition. In this sense, the use of diurnal energy, water, and carbon flux patterns to derive clues on ecosystem water limitation responses at a daily resolution could prove valuable, if nothing less than a benchmark to test current hypotheses. To this end, we propose two data-driven indicators derived directly from the eddy covariance data and based on theorized physiological responses to hydraulic and non-stomatal limitations. Hydraulic limitations (i.e. intra-plant limitations to water movement) are proxied using the relative diurnal centroid (C*ET), which measures the degree to which the flux of evapotranspiration (ET) is shifted toward the morning. Non-stomatal limitations (e.g. inhibitions of biochemical reactions, Rubisco activity, and/or mesophyll conductance) are characterized by the Diurnal Water:Carbon Index (DWCI), which measures the degree of coupling between ET and gross primary productivity (GPP) within each day. Globally, we found indications of hydraulic limitations in the form of significantly high frequencies of morning shifted days in dry/Mediterranean climates and savanna/evergreen plant functional types (PFT), whereas high frequencies of decoupling were dominated by dry climates and grassland/savanna PFTs indicating a prevalence of non-stomatal limitations in these ecosystems. Overall, both the diurnal centroid and DWCI were associated with high net radiation and low latent energy typical of drought. Using three water use efficiency (WUE) models, we found the mean differences between expected and observed WUE to be −0.14 to 0.56 μmol/mmol and −0.52 to −0.64 μmol/mmol for decoupled and morning shifted days respectively compared to mean differences −1.41 to −1.43 μmol/mmol in dry conditions. These results suggest that morning shifts/hydraulic responses are associated with an increase in WUE whereas decoupling/non-stomatal limitations are not.
@article{
 title = {Water stress induced breakdown of carbon-water relations: indicators from diurnal FLUXNET patterns},
 type = {article},
 year = {2017},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 pages = {1-19},
 volume = {19},
 websites = {https://www.biogeosciences-discuss.net/bg-2017-152/},
 id = {561e7178-441b-3d2c-8fb0-1ed8ae3a2e62},
 created = {2018-04-24T14:30:58.966Z},
 file_attached = {false},
 profile_id = {5c1040db-25e3-36ea-a919-0994a44709e7},
 group_id = {c4af41cc-7e3c-3fd3-9982-bdb923596eee},
 last_modified = {2020-09-08T15:25:47.277Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 citation_key = {Nelson2017},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {Understanding of terrestrial carbon and water cycles is currently hampered by an uncertainty in how to capture the large variety of plant responses to drought across climates, ecological strategies, and environments. In FLUXNET, the global network of CO2 and H2O flux observations, many sites do not uniformly report the ancillary variables needed to study drought response physiology such as soil moisture, sap flux, or species composition. In this sense, the use of diurnal energy, water, and carbon flux patterns to derive clues on ecosystem water limitation responses at a daily resolution could prove valuable, if nothing less than a benchmark to test current hypotheses. To this end, we propose two data-driven indicators derived directly from the eddy covariance data and based on theorized physiological responses to hydraulic and non-stomatal limitations. Hydraulic limitations (i.e. intra-plant limitations to water movement) are proxied using the relative diurnal centroid (C*ET), which measures the degree to which the flux of evapotranspiration (ET) is shifted toward the morning. Non-stomatal limitations (e.g. inhibitions of biochemical reactions, Rubisco activity, and/or mesophyll conductance) are characterized by the Diurnal Water:Carbon Index (DWCI), which measures the degree of coupling between ET and gross primary productivity (GPP) within each day. Globally, we found indications of hydraulic limitations in the form of significantly high frequencies of morning shifted days in dry/Mediterranean climates and savanna/evergreen plant functional types (PFT), whereas high frequencies of decoupling were dominated by dry climates and grassland/savanna PFTs indicating a prevalence of non-stomatal limitations in these ecosystems. Overall, both the diurnal centroid and DWCI were associated with high net radiation and low latent energy typical of drought. Using three water use efficiency (WUE) models, we found the mean differences between expected and observed WUE to be −0.14 to 0.56 μmol/mmol and −0.52 to −0.64 μmol/mmol for decoupled and morning shifted days respectively compared to mean differences −1.41 to −1.43 μmol/mmol in dry conditions. These results suggest that morning shifts/hydraulic responses are associated with an increase in WUE whereas decoupling/non-stomatal limitations are not.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Nelson, Jacob A. and Carvalhais, Nuno and Migliavacca, Mirco and Reichstein, Markus and Jung, Martin},
 journal = {Biogeosciences Discussions},
 number = {October},
 keywords = {FR8LBR,FR_AUR,FR_FON,FR_GRI,FR_HES,FR_LAM,FR_LQ1,FR_LQ2,FR_PUE,GF_GUY}
}
Downloads: 0