MODIS and Vector-Borne Diseases. Neteler, M. & Metz, M. 6(4):713257+.
MODIS and Vector-Borne Diseases [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Many regions in the world face an increasing risk for new or re-emerging vector-borne diseases. Subsequently, there is a strong need in addressing increasing challenges for human and veterinary public health across the globe. Dengue fever, borreliosis (Lyme disease), plague, West Nile fever, and tularaemia are examples for globally distributed vector-borne diseases with a high potential to affect people. Tick-borne rickettsial diseases (Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever) are common in North America, whereas tick-borne encephalitis is widespread in Europe and Asia. Hantaviruses, transmitted by rodents, can cause different diseases in the Old and New World. Common to all these vector-borne diseases is an urgent need to gain better understanding of spatio-temporal patterns in disease transmission and diffusion. Disease vectors depend in most cases on climatic and environmental conditions which in turn can be observed using Earth Observation (EO) instruments. New methods including the use of high-resolution time series from satellites in spatial models enable researchers to predict species invasion and survival, and to assess potential health risks. Of high importance are the daily data obtained by MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), which is flown on board the satellites Terra and Aqua. More than a decade of high quality data sets and operational products are freely available. These can be leveraged to assess the spread of disease vectors in order to assist decision-makers and public health authorities to develop surveillance plans and vector control.
@article{netelerMODISVectorBorneDiseases2013,
  title = {{{MODIS}} and {{Vector}}-{{Borne Diseases}}},
  author = {Neteler, Markus and Metz, Markus},
  date = {2013},
  journaltitle = {IEEE Earthzine},
  volume = {6},
  pages = {713257+},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/13158781},
  abstract = {Many regions in the world face an increasing risk for new or re-emerging vector-borne diseases. Subsequently, there is a strong need in addressing increasing challenges for human and veterinary public health across the globe. Dengue fever, borreliosis (Lyme disease), plague, West Nile fever, and tularaemia are examples for globally distributed vector-borne diseases with a high potential to affect people. Tick-borne rickettsial diseases (Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever) are common in North America, whereas tick-borne encephalitis is widespread in Europe and Asia. Hantaviruses, transmitted by rodents, can cause different diseases in the Old and New World. Common to all these vector-borne diseases is an urgent need to gain better understanding of spatio-temporal patterns in disease transmission and diffusion. Disease vectors depend in most cases on climatic and environmental conditions which in turn can be observed using Earth Observation (EO) instruments. New methods including the use of high-resolution time series from satellites in spatial models enable researchers to predict species invasion and survival, and to assess potential health risks. Of high importance are the daily data obtained by MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), which is flown on board the satellites Terra and Aqua. More than a decade of high quality data sets and operational products are freely available. These can be leveraged to assess the spread of disease vectors in order to assist decision-makers and public health authorities to develop surveillance plans and vector control.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13158781,human-diseases,human-health,modis,remote-sensing},
  number = {4}
}
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