Messy institutions for wicked problems: How to generate clumsy solutions?. Ney, S. & Verweij, M. Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, 33(6):1679–1696, December, 2015.
Messy institutions for wicked problems: How to generate clumsy solutions? [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
The idea that ‘wicked’ environmental and social problems can be resolved with ‘clumsy’ solutions has been increasingly supported by empirical evidence. Clumsy solutions emerge from a new type of dialogue-based problem-solving strategy, derived from what Funtowicz and Ravetz call ‘post-normal science’. How, then, can such dialogues best be organised? We offer an answer by combining the framework from which the notion of clumsy solutions was derived – namely Mary Douglas’ cultural theory – with the many decision-making procedures for addressing wicked problems proposed in policy and organisational studies. Employing the former theory, we explore 17 widely applied decision-making processes. The analysis identifies six methods most likely and seven methods least likely to successfully initiate post-normal dialogue. Moreover, the analysis suggests four processes that ‘almost’ fulfil the criteria for generating clumsy solutions. The paper then explores and suggests ways of extending and augmenting these ‘almost’ cases to enable post-normal dialogues and clumsy solutions.
@article{ney_messy_2015,
	title = {Messy institutions for wicked problems: {How} to generate clumsy solutions?},
	volume = {33},
	issn = {0263-774X},
	shorttitle = {Messy institutions for wicked problems},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1177/0263774X15614450},
	doi = {10.1177/0263774X15614450},
	abstract = {The idea that ‘wicked’ environmental and social problems can be resolved with ‘clumsy’ solutions has been increasingly supported by empirical evidence. Clumsy solutions emerge from a new type of dialogue-based problem-solving strategy, derived from what Funtowicz and Ravetz call ‘post-normal science’. How, then, can such dialogues best be organised? We offer an answer by combining the framework from which the notion of clumsy solutions was derived – namely Mary Douglas’ cultural theory – with the many decision-making procedures for addressing wicked problems proposed in policy and organisational studies. Employing the former theory, we explore 17 widely applied decision-making processes. The analysis identifies six methods most likely and seven methods least likely to successfully initiate post-normal dialogue. Moreover, the analysis suggests four processes that ‘almost’ fulfil the criteria for generating clumsy solutions. The paper then explores and suggests ways of extending and augmenting these ‘almost’ cases to enable post-normal dialogues and clumsy solutions.},
	language = {en},
	number = {6},
	urldate = {2018-05-09},
	journal = {Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy},
	author = {Ney, Steven and Verweij, Marco},
	month = dec,
	year = {2015},
	pages = {1679--1696},
}

Downloads: 0