Maurice Halbwachs. Nikulin, D. In Bernecker, S. & Michaelian, K., editors, The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Memory, pages 528–536. Routledge, New York, 2017.
abstract   bibtex   
[first paragraph] Collective memory is at the center of the debate about the relationship between individual memory and the memory as defined by one's participation in a group. The term was introduced by Maurice Halbwachs (Reims, 1877–Buchenwald concentration camp, 1945), who was a prominent French sociologist and wrote on a wide variety of topics, including statistics, Leibniz's philosophy, probability theory, religion, suicide, urbanism, the working class, and social morphology and psychology. Yet Halbwachs became mostly known—more often referred to than read—for his work on memory, to which he returned often. Halbwachs set down the foundations for his work on memory with the groundbreaking study The Social Frameworks of Memory (Les cadres sociaux de la mémoire, 1925), which introduces the notion of collective memory within different social groups. His thinking on memory then continues in numerous works, including a piece on collective memory among musicians, "The Collective Memory of Musicians" ("La mémoire collective chez les musiciens," 1939), which argues that the memory of musicians is social in nature, the book The Legendary Topography of the Gospels in the Holy Land (1941), which traces the changes in the ways the social memory of places is transformed over time due to their new imaginary representation and interpretation, and the posthumously published Collective Memory (1950), which discusses the relationship between collective, individual, and historical memory, and collective memory's temporal and spatial determinations. Throughout these works, providing references to introspection, literary examples, historical observations, and empirical data, Halbwachs touches upon different aspects of memory as related to language, history, and various social groups (family, class, nation, religious, and professional community). Yet the main insight of Halbwachs remains the same: memory is primarily a social collective phenomenon, which means that one can only remember within a group.
@incollection{Nikulin2017,
abstract = {[first paragraph] Collective memory is at the center of the debate about the relationship between individual memory and the memory as defined by one's participation in a group. The term was introduced by Maurice Halbwachs (Reims, 1877–Buchenwald concentration camp, 1945), who was a prominent French sociologist and wrote on a wide variety of topics, including statistics, Leibniz's philosophy, probability theory, religion, suicide, urbanism, the working class, and social morphology and psychology. Yet Halbwachs became mostly known—more often referred to than read—for his work on memory, to which he returned often. Halbwachs set down the foundations for his work on memory with the groundbreaking study The Social Frameworks of Memory (Les cadres sociaux de la m{\'{e}}moire, 1925), which introduces the notion of collective memory within different social groups. His thinking on memory then continues in numerous works, including a piece on collective memory among musicians, "The Collective Memory of Musicians" ("La m{\'{e}}moire collective chez les musiciens," 1939), which argues that the memory of musicians is social in nature, the book The Legendary Topography of the Gospels in the Holy Land (1941), which traces the changes in the ways the social memory of places is transformed over time due to their new imaginary representation and interpretation, and the posthumously published Collective Memory (1950), which discusses the relationship between collective, individual, and historical memory, and collective memory's temporal and spatial determinations. Throughout these works, providing references to introspection, literary examples, historical observations, and empirical data, Halbwachs touches upon different aspects of memory as related to language, history, and various social groups (family, class, nation, religious, and professional community). Yet the main insight of Halbwachs remains the same: memory is primarily a social collective phenomenon, which means that one can only remember within a group.},
address = {New York},
author = {Nikulin, Dmitri},
booktitle = {The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Memory},
editor = {Bernecker, Sven and Michaelian, Kourken},
file = {:Users/michaelk/Library/Application Support/Mendeley Desktop/Downloaded/Nikulin - 2017 - Maurice Halbwachs.pdf:pdf},
pages = {528--536},
publisher = {Routledge},
title = {{Maurice Halbwachs}},
year = {2017}
}
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