The Genetic History of Peninsular Malaysia. Norhalifah, H. K., Syaza, F. H., Chambers, G. K., & Edinur, H. A. Gene.
The Genetic History of Peninsular Malaysia [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This article explores the genetic history of the various sub-populations currently living in Peninsular Malaysia. This region has received multiple waves of migrants like the Orang Asli in prehistoric times and the Chinese, Indians, Europeans and Arabs during historic times. There are three highly distinct lineages that make up the Orang Asli; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. The Semang, who have ‘Negrito’ characteristics, represent the first human settlers in Peninsular Malaysia arriving from about 50,000 ya. The Senoi later migrated from Indochina and are a mix between an Asian Neolithic population and the Semang. These Asian genomes probably came in before Austroasiatic languages arrived between 5,000 and 4000 years ago. Semang and Senoi both now speak Austro-Asiatic languages indicative of cultural diffusion from Senoi to Semang. In contrast, the Proto-Malays who came last to the southern part of this region speak Austronesian language and are Austronesians with some Negrito admixture. It is from this group that the contemporary Malays emerged. Here we provide an overview of the best available genetic evidences (single nucleotide polymorphisms, mitochondrial DNA, Y-chromosome, blood groups, human platelet antigen, human leukocyte antigen, human neutrophil antigen and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) supporting the complex genetic history of Peninsular Malaysia. Large scale sampling and high throughput genetic screening programmes such as those using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analyses have provided insights into various ancestral and admixture genetic fractions in this region. Given the now extensive admixture present in the contemporary descendants of ancient sub-populations in Peninsular Malaysia, improved reconstruction of human migration history in this region will require new evidence from ancient DNA in well-preserved skeletons. All other aspect of the highly diverse and complex genetic makeup in Peninsular Malaysia should be considered carefully for genetic mapping of disease loci and policy formation by health authorities.
@article{norhalifah_genetic_????,
	title = {The {Genetic} {History} of {Peninsular} {Malaysia}},
	issn = {0378-1119},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378111916302566},
	doi = {10.1016/j.gene.2016.04.008},
	abstract = {This article explores the genetic history of the various sub-populations currently living in Peninsular Malaysia. This region has received multiple waves of migrants like the Orang Asli in prehistoric times and the Chinese, Indians, Europeans and Arabs during historic times. There are three highly distinct lineages that make up the Orang Asli; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. The Semang, who have ‘Negrito’ characteristics, represent the first human settlers in Peninsular Malaysia arriving from about 50,000 ya. The Senoi later migrated from Indochina and are a mix between an Asian Neolithic population and the Semang. These Asian genomes probably came in before Austroasiatic languages arrived between 5,000 and 4000 years ago. Semang and Senoi both now speak Austro-Asiatic languages indicative of cultural diffusion from Senoi to Semang. In contrast, the Proto-Malays who came last to the southern part of this region speak Austronesian language and are Austronesians with some Negrito admixture. It is from this group that the contemporary Malays emerged.

Here we provide an overview of the best available genetic evidences (single nucleotide polymorphisms, mitochondrial DNA, Y-chromosome, blood groups, human platelet antigen, human leukocyte antigen, human neutrophil antigen and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) supporting the complex genetic history of Peninsular Malaysia. Large scale sampling and high throughput genetic screening programmes such as those using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analyses have provided insights into various ancestral and admixture genetic fractions in this region. Given the now extensive admixture present in the contemporary descendants of ancient sub-populations in Peninsular Malaysia, improved reconstruction of human migration history in this region will require new evidence from ancient DNA in well-preserved skeletons. All other aspect of the highly diverse and complex genetic makeup in Peninsular Malaysia should be considered carefully for genetic mapping of disease loci and policy formation by health authorities.},
	urldate = {2016-04-11},
	journal = {Gene},
	author = {Norhalifah, Hanim Kamis and Syaza, Fatnin Hisham and Chambers, Geoffrey Keith and Edinur, Hisham Atan},
	keywords = {Austronesians, genetics, Malays and Peninsular Malaysia, Orang Asli},
	file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:files/54357/Norhalifah et al. - The Genetic History of Peninsular Malaysia.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:files/54358/S0378111916302566.html:text/html}
}
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