Assessing the Role of Vegetation on Soil Slopes in Urban Areas. Norris, J. E. & Greenwood, J. R. In Proceedings of the 10th IAEG International Congress, IAEG2006, pages 744+.
Assessing the Role of Vegetation on Soil Slopes in Urban Areas [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Vegetation has generally been recognised for its aesthetic landscaping qualities in the urban environment, especially along transportation corridors and for use as noise barriers. The detrimental effects of vegetation are also recognised. Trees and shrubs draw out moisture from the ground through evapotranspiration processes, which leads to the seasonal shrinkage and swelling of clay soils. In adverse climatic conditions, e.g. prolonged hot and dry summers, moisture reduction in clay soils may cause substantial damage to buildings and property. This paper reports on recent projects and studies in the UK and Europe, including the ECO-SLOPES Project (http://construction.ntu.ac.uk) which investigated and defined the positive roles of vegetation in improving the stability of sloping ground. In urban areas, bioengineering techniques have been applied to combat the problems of soil erosion and the shallow landslides that result in the instability of earthworks on the UK's transport network. The engineering influences of vegetation including moisture and pore water pressure changes, and root reinforcement effects are assessed and techniques for monitoring these influences discussed. The inclusion of the vegetation effects are demonstrated in routine limit equilibrium stability analysis. It is concluded that the roots of appropriately planted and maintained vegetation are likely to provide a 10\,% increase in the factor of safety of potential shallow slip surfaces. A computer based slope decision support system is presented to assist engineers to assess the likelihood of a 'slope' being suitable for bioengineering techniques. The slope decision support system is freely available on the ECO-SLOPES website for users to try and feedback on its applicability.
@inproceedings{norrisAssessingRoleVegetation2006,
  title = {Assessing the Role of Vegetation on Soil Slopes in Urban Areas},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 10th {{IAEG International Congress}}, {{IAEG2006}}},
  author = {Norris, Joanne E. and Greenwood, John R.},
  date = {2006},
  pages = {744+},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/13817595____to-archive},
  abstract = {Vegetation has generally been recognised for its aesthetic landscaping qualities in the urban environment, especially along transportation corridors and for use as noise barriers. The detrimental effects of vegetation are also recognised. Trees and shrubs draw out moisture from the ground through evapotranspiration processes, which leads to the seasonal shrinkage and swelling of clay soils. In adverse climatic conditions, e.g. prolonged hot and dry summers, moisture reduction in clay soils may cause substantial damage to buildings and property. This paper reports on recent projects and studies in the UK and Europe, including the ECO-SLOPES Project (http://construction.ntu.ac.uk) which investigated and defined the positive roles of vegetation in improving the stability of sloping ground. In urban areas, bioengineering techniques have been applied to combat the problems of soil erosion and the shallow landslides that result in the instability of earthworks on the UK's transport network. The engineering influences of vegetation including moisture and pore water pressure changes, and root reinforcement effects are assessed and techniques for monitoring these influences discussed. The inclusion of the vegetation effects are demonstrated in routine limit equilibrium stability analysis. It is concluded that the roots of appropriately planted and maintained vegetation are likely to provide a 10\,\% increase in the factor of safety of potential shallow slip surfaces. A computer based slope decision support system is presented to assist engineers to assess the likelihood of a 'slope' being suitable for bioengineering techniques. The slope decision support system is freely available on the ECO-SLOPES website for users to try and feedback on its applicability.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13817595,alnus-glutinosa,alnus-incana,betula-pendula,fagus-sylvatica,forest-resources,landslides,nothofagus-spp,picea-sitchensis,quercus-pedunculata,quercus-robur,quercus-rubra,robinia-pseudoacacia,salix-purpurea,soil-resources,tensile-root-strength},
  venue = {Nottingham, United Kingdom}
}
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