Tired of being fatigued? Introduction to the Special Issue. Nowack, K. & Deal, J. J. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 69(2):63–65, 2017.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
One of the most common workplace issues discussed today is that of always feeling fatigued. Today many employees at all levels in organizations are overloaded and overwhelmed, feel they can never disconnect from work, worry about work-life balance, and are getting burned out and exhausted from overwork. Some people attribute that fatigue to individual issues, such as the inability to say no, create balance, or have competitive drive. Others attribute it to changes in work habits as a result of technological advances. And still others attribute it to organizational structures and job demands. It appears that everyone is partially correct. This special issue of Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research addresses two core questions: What are the causes of fatigue, and what can be done to reduce it? To address these questions, the articles assess the issue of fatigue from different perspectives, and they provide recommendations about actions that individuals, consultants, human-resources professionals, leaders, and organizations can take to reduce the fatigue that is plaguing staff at all levels of the organization. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)
@article{nowack_tired_2017,
	title = {Tired of being fatigued? {Introduction} to the {Special} {Issue}},
	volume = {69},
	issn = {1939-0149(Electronic),1065-9293(Print)},
	shorttitle = {Tired of being fatigued?},
	doi = {10.1037/cpb0000093},
	abstract = {One of the most common workplace issues discussed today is that of always feeling fatigued. Today many employees at all levels in organizations are overloaded and overwhelmed, feel they can never disconnect from work, worry about work-life balance, and are getting burned out and exhausted from overwork. Some people attribute that fatigue to individual issues, such as the inability to say no, create balance, or have competitive drive. Others attribute it to changes in work habits as a result of technological advances. And still others attribute it to organizational structures and job demands. It appears that everyone is partially correct. This special issue of Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research addresses two core questions: What are the causes of fatigue, and what can be done to reduce it? To address these questions, the articles assess the issue of fatigue from different perspectives, and they provide recommendations about actions that individuals, consultants, human-resources professionals, leaders, and organizations can take to reduce the fatigue that is plaguing staff at all levels of the organization. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)},
	number = {2},
	journal = {Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research},
	author = {Nowack, Kenneth and Deal, Jennifer J.},
	year = {2017},
	keywords = {Family Work Relationship, Fatigue, Occupational Stress, Quality of Work Life},
	pages = {63--65}
}
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