Engagement as process in human-computer interactions. O'Brien, H. L. & Toms, E. G. Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 42(1):n/a--n/a, January, 2005. 00005
Engagement as process in human-computer interactions [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Recently there has been an increased emphasis on holistic user experiences in human-computer interactions. Interface design is moving beyond usability, aiming to be aesthetically pleasing, emotionally appealing, and engaging. The term engagement is frequently mentioned in the literature as a goal of interface design, yet the construct remains abstract and ill-defined. The well-established frameworks of Flow Theory, Play Theory, and Aesthetic Theory provide a foundation in which to ground engagement and to begin to explore the attributes that must be present in engaging design. We conceptualize engagement as a process rather than a single instance. Our proposed model views engaging interactions as being comprised of three distinct stages: the user must become engaged, sustain the engagement, and eventually disengage from the system. Establishing a solid framework for engagement will enable us to operationally define the term and to develop techniques and instruments for measuring it. Without a rich, theoretical understanding of what constitutes engaging interactions between users and computer interfaces, we cannot ensure that design practices are truly engaging; user's experience with computer-mediated environments must involve the user cognitively, behaviorally, and affectively.
@article{obrien_engagement_2005,
	title = {Engagement as process in human-computer interactions},
	volume = {42},
	issn = {1550-8390},
	url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/meet.14504201233/abstract},
	doi = {10.1002/meet.14504201233},
	abstract = {Recently there has been an increased emphasis on holistic user experiences in human-computer interactions. Interface design is moving beyond usability, aiming to be aesthetically pleasing, emotionally appealing, and engaging. The term engagement is frequently mentioned in the literature as a goal of interface design, yet the construct remains abstract and ill-defined. The well-established frameworks of Flow Theory, Play Theory, and Aesthetic Theory provide a foundation in which to ground engagement and to begin to explore the attributes that must be present in engaging design. We conceptualize engagement as a process rather than a single instance. Our proposed model views engaging interactions as being comprised of three distinct stages: the user must become engaged, sustain the engagement, and eventually disengage from the system. Establishing a solid framework for engagement will enable us to operationally define the term and to develop techniques and instruments for measuring it. Without a rich, theoretical understanding of what constitutes engaging interactions between users and computer interfaces, we cannot ensure that design practices are truly engaging; user's experience with computer-mediated environments must involve the user cognitively, behaviorally, and affectively.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2017-10-29TZ},
	journal = {Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology},
	author = {O'Brien, Heather L. and Toms, Elaine G.},
	month = jan,
	year = {2005},
	note = {00005},
	keywords = {engagement, human computer interaction, information architecture, interactive systems, interfaces},
	pages = {n/a--n/a}
}
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