- Executive Functions and Methylphenidate Response in Subtypes of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. O'Driscoll, G A, Depatie, L, Holahan, A V, Savion-Lemieux, T, Barr, R G, Jolicoeur, C., & Douglas, V I - Biological Psychiatry, 57(- 11):– 1452, 11, // Age, 2005.
abstract   bibtex   
- Background: Oculomotor tasks are a well-established means of studying executive functions and frontal-striatal functioning in both nonhuman primates and humans. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is thought to implicate frontal-striatal circuitry. We used oculomotor tests to investigate executive functions and methylphenidate response in two subtypes of ADHD. Methods: Subjects were boys, aged 11.5-14 years, with ADHD-combined (n = 10), ADHD-inattentive (n = 12), and control subjects (n = 10). Executive functions assessed were motor planning (tapped with predictive saccades), response inhibition (antisaccades), and task switching (saccades-antisaccades mixed). Results: The ADHD-combined boys were impaired relative to control subjects in motor planning (p .92). They were also significantly impaired relative to ADHD-inattentive boys, making fewer predictive saccades (p \textless .03) and having more subjects with antisaccade performance in the impaired range (p \textless .04). Methylphenidate significantly improved motor planning and response inhibition in both subtypes. Conclusions: ADHD-combined but not ADHD-inattentive boys showed impairments on motor planning and response inhibition. These deficits might be mediated by brain structures implicated specifically in the hyperactive/impulsive symptoms. Methylphenidate improved oculomotor performance in both subtypes; thus, it was effective even when initial performance was not impaired. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)(journal abstract)
@article{driscoll2005executive,
abstract = {- Background: Oculomotor tasks are a well-established means of studying executive functions and frontal-striatal functioning in both nonhuman primates and humans. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is thought to implicate frontal-striatal circuitry. We used oculomotor tests to investigate executive functions and methylphenidate response in two subtypes of ADHD. Methods: Subjects were boys, aged 11.5-14 years, with ADHD-combined (n = 10), ADHD-inattentive (n = 12), and control subjects (n = 10). Executive functions assessed were motor planning (tapped with predictive saccades), response inhibition (antisaccades), and task switching (saccades-antisaccades mixed). Results: The ADHD-combined boys were impaired relative to control subjects in motor planning (p .92). They were also significantly impaired relative to ADHD-inattentive boys, making fewer predictive saccades (p {\textless} .03) and having more subjects with antisaccade performance in the impaired range (p {\textless} .04). Methylphenidate significantly improved motor planning and response inhibition in both subtypes. Conclusions: ADHD-combined but not ADHD-inattentive boys showed impairments on motor planning and response inhibition. These deficits might be mediated by brain structures implicated specifically in the hyperactive/impulsive symptoms. Methylphenidate improved oculomotor performance in both subtypes; thus, it was effective even when initial performance was not impaired. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)(journal abstract)},
address = {// Age},
author = {O'Driscoll, G A and Depatie, L and Holahan, A V and Savion-Lemieux, T and Barr, R G and Jolicoeur, Cl. and Douglas, V I},
isbn = {- 0006-3223, 0006-3223},
journal = {- Biological Psychiatry},
keywords = {Children},
mendeley-tags = {Children},
number = {- 11},
pages = {-- 1452},
publisher = {11},
title = {{- Executive Functions and Methylphenidate Response in Subtypes of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.}},
volume = {57},
year = {2005}
}
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