Efficient I/O for Computational Grid Applications. Oldfield, R. Ph.D. Thesis, 5, 2003.
Efficient I/O for Computational Grid Applications [pdf]Website  abstract   bibtex   
High-performance computing increasingly occurs on "computational grids" composed of heterogeneous and geographically distributed systems of computers, networks, and storage devices that collectively act as a single "virtual" computer. A key challenge in this environment is to provide efficient access to data distributed across remote data servers. This dissertation explores some of the issues associated with I/O for wide-area distributed computing and describes an I/O system, called Armada, with the following features: a framework to allow application and dataset providers to flexibly compose graphs of processing modules that describe the distribution, application interfaces, and processing required of the dataset before or after computation; an algorithm to restructure application graphs to increase parallelism and to improve network performance in a wide-area network; and a hierarchical graph-partitioning scheme that deploys components of the application graph in a way that is both beneficial to the application and sensitive to the administrative policies of the different administrative domains. Experiments show that applications using Armada perform well in both low- and high-bandwidth environments, and that our approach does an exceptional job of hiding the network latency inherent in grid computing.
@phdthesis{
 title = {Efficient I/O for Computational Grid Applications},
 type = {phdthesis},
 year = {2003},
 keywords = {dartmouth-cs,grid-computing,parallel-i-o,pario-bib},
 websites = {http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/reports/TR2003-459.pdf},
 month = {5},
 city = {Hanover, NH},
 institution = {Dartmouth College Computer Science},
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 created = {2018-07-12T21:31:28.861Z},
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 notes = {Available as Dartmouth Computer Science Technical Report TR2003-459<br/>Ph.D Dissertation. Advisor: David Kotz.},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {High-performance computing increasingly occurs on "computational grids" composed of heterogeneous and geographically distributed systems of computers, networks, and storage devices that collectively act as a single "virtual" computer. A key challenge in this environment is to provide efficient access to data distributed across remote data servers. This dissertation explores some of the issues associated with I/O for wide-area distributed computing and describes an I/O system, called Armada, with the following features: a framework to allow application and dataset providers to flexibly compose graphs of processing modules that describe the distribution, application interfaces, and processing required of the dataset before or after computation; an algorithm to restructure application graphs to increase parallelism and to improve network performance in a wide-area network; and a hierarchical graph-partitioning scheme that deploys components of the application graph in a way that is both beneficial to the application and sensitive to the administrative policies of the different administrative domains. Experiments show that applications using Armada perform well in both low- and high-bandwidth environments, and that our approach does an exceptional job of hiding the network latency inherent in grid computing.},
 bibtype = {phdthesis},
 author = {Oldfield, Ron}
}
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