Reproduction of an Introduced Population of Eleutherodactylus johnstonei at Bucaramanga, Colombia. Ortega, J., E., Serrano, V., H., & Ramírez, M., P. Copeia, 2005(3):642-648, 2005.
abstract   bibtex   
Comparative ecological data on introduced populations can contribute to understanding why Eleutherodactylus johnstonei is a good invader. We studied the reproductive features of an introduced population of this species and compared them with similar data on other introduced and native populations. Females were larger than males; sexually mature males ranged between 17-29 mm snout vent length and females between 23-32 mm. Reproductive males and females were captured throughout the year and there were no monthly significant differences in their occurrence. Clutches and neonates occurred year-round. The adjusted testicular volume did not vary significantly among months and histological analyses of the testes and ducts revealed the presence of sperm through the year, indicating continuous reproductive activity for males. The ovarian volume did not vary significantly among months and the presence of yolked follicles were observed throughout the year, indicating that females also reproduce continuously. There was a positive relationship between female body size and the number of yolked follicles. Two different relationships associated with reproduction could explain sexual differences in body size; the larger body size in females allows greater clutch sizes, and the energy cost of calling activity and paternal care of the clutch limits male growth. The colonizing success of E. johnstonei appears to be related to its reproductive features, such as flexibility in reproductive activity, direct development, and parental care of the clutch, allowing it to easily occupy disturbed areas that it encounters.
@article{
 title = {Reproduction of an Introduced Population of Eleutherodactylus johnstonei at Bucaramanga, Colombia},
 type = {article},
 year = {2005},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 pages = {642-648},
 volume = {2005},
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 created = {2014-11-12T15:37:43.000Z},
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 last_modified = {2015-08-21T02:37:41.000Z},
 tags = {Eleutherodactylus johnstonei},
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 starred = {false},
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 abstract = {Comparative ecological data on introduced populations can contribute to understanding why Eleutherodactylus johnstonei is a good invader. We studied the reproductive features of an introduced population of this species and compared them with similar data on other introduced and native populations. Females were larger than males; sexually mature males ranged between 17-29 mm snout vent length and females between 23-32 mm. Reproductive males and females were captured throughout the year and there were no monthly significant differences in their occurrence. Clutches and neonates occurred year-round. The adjusted testicular volume did not vary significantly among months and histological analyses of the testes and ducts revealed the presence of sperm through the year, indicating continuous reproductive activity for males. The ovarian volume did not vary significantly among months and the presence of yolked follicles were observed throughout the year, indicating that females also reproduce continuously. There was a positive relationship between female body size and the number of yolked follicles. Two different relationships associated with reproduction could explain sexual differences in body size; the larger body size in females allows greater clutch sizes, and the energy cost of calling activity and paternal care of the clutch limits male growth. The colonizing success of E. johnstonei appears to be related to its reproductive features, such as flexibility in reproductive activity, direct development, and parental care of the clutch, allowing it to easily occupy disturbed areas that it encounters.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Ortega, J. E. and Serrano, V. H. and Ramírez, M. P.},
 journal = {Copeia},
 number = {3}
}
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