Is There Any Role for Opioids in the Management of Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Osani, M. C., Lohmander, L. S., & Bannuru, R. R. Arthritis care & research, June, 2020. Place: United States
doi  abstract   bibtex   
OBJECTIVE: Opioids have long been prescribed for chronic pain conditions, including osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is little information about their temporal efficacy or differences in efficacy and safety between opioids with strong versus weak/intermediate μ opioid receptor binding affinity. To explore these research questions, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in patients with knee and/or hip OA. METHODS: We searched Medline, Embase, PubMed Central, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from inception to December 2019 and sought unpublished data. Placebo-controlled RCTs of oral opioids in knee and/or hip OA patients were included. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) were calculated for pain and function at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Subgroup analyses for strong and weak/intermediate opioids were conducted. Meta-regression was performed to assess impact of dosage (morphine equivalency) on pain relief. Risk ratios were calculated for safety at the final follow-up. RESULTS: 18 RCTs (9,283 participants) were included. Opioids demonstrated small benefits on pain at each time point, with SMDs (95% confidence interval) ranging from -0.28 (-0.38, -0.17) to -0.19 (-0.29, -0.08); similar effects were observed for function. Strong opioids demonstrated consistently inferior efficacy and overall worse safety than weak/intermediate opioids. Meta-regression revealed that incremental pain relief achieved beyond 20-50 mg doses was not substantial in the context of increased safety risks. CONCLUSIONS: Opioids provide minimal relief of OA symptoms within a 12 week period, and they are known to cause discomfort in a majority of patients. Clinicians and policy makers should reconsider the utility of opioids in the management of OA.
@article{osani_is_2020,
	title = {Is {There} {Any} {Role} for {Opioids} in the {Management} of {Knee} and {Hip} {Osteoarthritis}? {A}  {Systematic} {Review} and {Meta}-{Analysis}.},
	copyright = {This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.},
	issn = {2151-4658 2151-464X},
	doi = {10.1002/acr.24363},
	abstract = {OBJECTIVE: Opioids have long been prescribed for chronic pain conditions, including  osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is little information about their temporal  efficacy or differences in efficacy and safety between opioids with strong versus  weak/intermediate μ opioid receptor binding affinity. To explore these research  questions, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analyses of randomized  controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in patients with knee and/or hip OA. METHODS: We  searched Medline, Embase, PubMed Central, and the Cochrane Central Register of  Controlled Trials from inception to December 2019 and sought unpublished data.  Placebo-controlled RCTs of oral opioids in knee and/or hip OA patients were  included. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) were calculated for pain and function  at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Subgroup analyses for strong and weak/intermediate opioids  were conducted. Meta-regression was performed to assess impact of dosage (morphine  equivalency) on pain relief. Risk ratios were calculated for safety at the final  follow-up. RESULTS: 18 RCTs (9,283 participants) were included. Opioids demonstrated  small benefits on pain at each time point, with SMDs (95\% confidence interval)  ranging from -0.28 (-0.38, -0.17) to -0.19 (-0.29, -0.08); similar effects were  observed for function. Strong opioids demonstrated consistently inferior efficacy  and overall worse safety than weak/intermediate opioids. Meta-regression revealed  that incremental pain relief achieved beyond 20-50 mg doses was not substantial in  the context of increased safety risks. CONCLUSIONS: Opioids provide minimal relief  of OA symptoms within a 12 week period, and they are known to cause discomfort in a  majority of patients. Clinicians and policy makers should reconsider the utility of  opioids in the management of OA.},
	language = {eng},
	journal = {Arthritis care \& research},
	author = {Osani, Mikala C. and Lohmander, L. Stefan and Bannuru, Raveendhara R.},
	month = jun,
	year = {2020},
	pmid = {32583972},
	note = {Place: United States}
}
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