Preparing for the next pandemic. Osterholm, M. T. New England Journal of Medicine, 352(18):1839–1842, 2005. 00602
Preparing for the next pandemic [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
nnual influenza epidemics are like Minnesota winters — all are challenges, but some are worse than others. No matter how well we prepare, some blizzards take quite a toll. Each year, despite our efforts to increase the rates of influenza vaccination in our most vulnerable populations, unpredictable factors largely determine the burden of influenza disease and related deaths. During a typical year in the United States, 30,000 to 50,000 persons die as a result of influenzavirus infection, and the global death toll is about 20 to 30 times as high as the toll in this country. We usually accept this outcome as part of the cycle of life. Only when a vaccine shortage occurs or young children die suddenly does the public demand that someone step forward to change the course of the epidemic. Unfortunately, the fragile and limited production capacity of our 1950s egg-based technology for producing influenza vaccine and the lack of a national commitment to universal annual influenza vaccination mean that influenza epidemics will continue to present a substantial public health challenge for the foreseeable future.
@article{osterholm_preparing_2005,
	title = {Preparing for the next pandemic},
	volume = {352},
	url = {http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp058068},
	abstract = {nnual influenza epidemics are like Minnesota winters — all are challenges, but some are worse than others. No matter how well we prepare, some blizzards take quite a toll. Each year, despite our efforts to increase the rates of influenza vaccination in our most vulnerable populations, unpredictable factors largely determine the burden of influenza disease and related deaths. During a typical year in the United States, 30,000 to 50,000 persons die as a result of influenzavirus infection, and the global death toll is about 20 to 30 times as high as the toll in this country. We usually accept this outcome as part of the cycle of life. Only when a vaccine shortage occurs or young children die suddenly does the public demand that someone step forward to change the course of the epidemic. Unfortunately, the fragile and limited production capacity of our 1950s egg-based technology for producing influenza vaccine and the lack of a national commitment to universal annual influenza vaccination mean that influenza epidemics will continue to present a substantial public health challenge for the foreseeable future.},
	number = {18},
	urldate = {2016-01-21},
	journal = {New England Journal of Medicine},
	author = {Osterholm, Michael T.},
	year = {2005},
	note = {00602},
	keywords = {collapse, health-epidemics-pandemics},
	pages = {1839--1842},
	file = {Osterholm - 2005 - Preparing for the next pandemic.pdf:C\:\\Users\\rsrs\\Documents\\Zotero Database\\storage\\Q4KUS5V2\\Osterholm - 2005 - Preparing for the next pandemic.pdf:application/pdf}
}
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