The rehabilitation of attention in individuals with mild traumatic brain injury, using the APT-II programme. Palmese, C., a. and Raskin, S., a. Brain injury : [BI], 14(6):535-48, 6, 2000.
The rehabilitation of attention in individuals with mild traumatic brain injury, using the APT-II programme. [pdf]Paper  The rehabilitation of attention in individuals with mild traumatic brain injury, using the APT-II programme. [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a prevalent cause of cognitive impairments and dysfunctions and affects over 2 million individuals each year. Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is generally defined by a brief loss of consciousness, and post-traumatic amnesia that lasts for less than 24 hours. One region of the brain that is likely affected in patients with MTBI is the pre-frontal cortex. This region mediates several functions, including those required for adequate attention. Three individuals, diagnosed with MTBI and difficulties with attention, volunteered to participate in the study. Individuals were presented with 10 weeks of cognitive retraining with the Attention Process Training-II (APT-II) programme, followed by 6 or 7 weeks of educational and applicational programmes. Cognitive tests were administered both pre- and post-training to assess the effectiveness of the programme. Analysis of the results showed that the APT-II programme improved attention and performance speed in each of the three individuals. In addition, any rehabilitated cognitive skills remained stable in each individual in the absence of the rehabilitation programme for at least 6 weeks.
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 title = {The rehabilitation of attention in individuals with mild traumatic brain injury, using the APT-II programme.},
 type = {article},
 year = {2000},
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 keywords = {Adult,Attention,Attention: physiology,Brain Injuries,Brain Injuries: complications,Brain Injuries: physiopathology,Cognition Disorders,Cognition Disorders: epidemiology,Cognition Disorders: etiology,Cognition Disorders: rehabilitation,Female,Humans,Male,Middle Aged,Prefrontal Cortex,Prefrontal Cortex: physiopathology,Prevalence,Treatment Outcome},
 pages = {535-48},
 volume = {14},
 websites = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10887887},
 month = {6},
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 abstract = {Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a prevalent cause of cognitive impairments and dysfunctions and affects over 2 million individuals each year. Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is generally defined by a brief loss of consciousness, and post-traumatic amnesia that lasts for less than 24 hours. One region of the brain that is likely affected in patients with MTBI is the pre-frontal cortex. This region mediates several functions, including those required for adequate attention. Three individuals, diagnosed with MTBI and difficulties with attention, volunteered to participate in the study. Individuals were presented with 10 weeks of cognitive retraining with the Attention Process Training-II (APT-II) programme, followed by 6 or 7 weeks of educational and applicational programmes. Cognitive tests were administered both pre- and post-training to assess the effectiveness of the programme. Analysis of the results showed that the APT-II programme improved attention and performance speed in each of the three individuals. In addition, any rehabilitated cognitive skills remained stable in each individual in the absence of the rehabilitation programme for at least 6 weeks.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Palmese, C a and Raskin, S a},
 journal = {Brain injury : [BI]},
 number = {6}
}
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