Spatial ecology of Blanding's turtle in central Minnesota. Piepgras, S. A. and Lang, J. W. Chelonian Conservation and Biology, 3:589--601, 2000.
abstract   bibtex   
We studied the movements, activity centers, and home ranges of Blanding's turtles (Emydoidea blandingii) in central Minnesota at the northwestern limit of the species' range. We monitored 46 turtles (15 males, 24 females, and 7 juveniles) via radio telemetry for two summers and an intervening winter (1996-97), and examined their records in a GIS database using ARCVIEW spatial analyses. Turtles were active from April through November, and spent the winter under ice in shallow water. Some males, females, and juveniles moved from overwintering marshes into summer wetlands, whereas others were sedentary and remained in the same wetland. Overall, males moved more often, but over shorter distances than did females. Females moved primarily during nesting. Males had the most activity centers, but these were small (1.7 ha) relative to those of females (2.1 ha). Male and female home ranges (7.8 ha) did not differ, but were larger than those of juveniles (5.9 ha). Juveniles had few activity centers, but these were large (2.6 ha). Several juveniles moved large distances relative to adults. Home ranges showed overlap among turtles. Individual turtles used the same areas from one season to the next. Most turtles resided in shrub swamps, and tended to remain longer and move farther in large vs. small swamps. Blanding's turtles in central Minnesota had large activity centers and home ranges in comparison to those studied elsewhere, and these features may be related to relatively low population density, patchy resources, and/or dispersed wetlands. The main conservation concern is the preservation of intact mosaics of upland and wetland habitats of sufficient size to support viable turtle populations
@article{piepgras_spatial_2000,
	title = {Spatial ecology of {Blanding}'s turtle in central {Minnesota}},
	volume = {3},
	abstract = {We studied the movements, activity centers, and home ranges of Blanding's turtles (Emydoidea blandingii) in central Minnesota at the northwestern limit of the species' range. We monitored 46 turtles (15 males, 24 females, and 7 juveniles) via radio telemetry for two summers and an intervening winter (1996-97), and examined their records in a GIS database using ARCVIEW spatial analyses. Turtles were active from April through November, and spent the winter under ice in shallow water. Some males, females, and juveniles moved from overwintering marshes into summer wetlands, whereas others were sedentary and remained in the same wetland. Overall, males moved more often, but over shorter distances than did females. Females moved primarily during nesting. Males had the most activity centers, but these were small (1.7 ha) relative to those of females (2.1 ha). Male and female home ranges (7.8 ha) did not differ, but were larger than those of juveniles (5.9 ha). Juveniles had few activity centers, but these were large (2.6 ha). Several juveniles moved large distances relative to adults. Home ranges showed overlap among turtles. Individual turtles used the same areas from one season to the next. Most turtles resided in shrub swamps, and tended to remain longer and move farther in large vs. small swamps. Blanding's turtles in central Minnesota had large activity centers and home ranges in comparison to those studied elsewhere, and these features may be related to relatively low population density, patchy resources, and/or dispersed wetlands. The main conservation concern is the preservation of intact mosaics of upland and wetland habitats of sufficient size to support viable turtle populations},
	journal = {Chelonian Conservation and Biology},
	author = {Piepgras, S. A. and Lang, J. W.},
	year = {2000},
	pages = {589--601}
}
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