Less improvement following meniscal repair compared with arthroscopic partial meniscectomy: a prospective cohort study of patient-reported outcomes in 150 young adults at 1- and 5-years’ follow-up. Pihl, K., Englund, M., Christensen, R., Lohmander, L. S., Jørgensen, U., Viberg, B., Fristed, J. V., & Thorlund, J. B. Acta Orthopaedica, 0(0):1–8, April, 2021. Publisher: Taylor & Francis _eprint: https://doi.org/10.1080/17453674.2021.1917826
Less improvement following meniscal repair compared with arthroscopic partial meniscectomy: a prospective cohort study of patient-reported outcomes in 150 young adults at 1- and 5-years’ follow-up [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Background and purpose — Meniscal repair may reduce long-term risk of knee osteoarthritis compared with arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM), whereas patient-reported outcomes may be poorer at short term than for APM. We compared patient-reported outcomes in young adults undergoing meniscal repair or APM up to ∼5 years after surgery.Patients and methods — We included 150 patients aged 18–40 years from the Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS) undergoing meniscal repair or APM. Between-group differences in change in a composite of 4 of 5 Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales (pain, symptoms, sport and recreation, and quality of life—KOOS4) from baseline, 12, and 52 weeks, and a median of 5 years (range 4–6 years) were analyzed using adjusted mixed linear models, with 52 weeks being the primary endpoint.Results — 32 patients had meniscal repair (mean age 26 [SD 6]), and 118 patients underwent APM (mean age 32 [SD 7]). The repair and APM groups improved in KOOS4 from before to 52 weeks after surgery (least square means 7 and 19, respectively; adjusted mean difference –12, [95% CI –19 to –4] in favor of APM). Both groups improved further from 52 weeks to 5 years after surgery with the difference in KOOS4 scores between the groups remaining similar.Interpretation — Patients having meniscal repair experienced less improvements in patient-reported outcomes from baseline to 52 weeks and 5 years post-surgery. The findings highlight the need for randomized trials comparing these interventions in terms of patient-reported outcomes and knee OA development.
@article{pihl_less_2021,
	title = {Less improvement following meniscal repair compared with arthroscopic partial meniscectomy: a prospective cohort study of patient-reported outcomes in 150 young adults at 1- and 5-years’ follow-up},
	volume = {0},
	issn = {1745-3674},
	shorttitle = {Less improvement following meniscal repair compared with arthroscopic partial meniscectomy},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1080/17453674.2021.1917826},
	doi = {10.1080/17453674.2021.1917826},
	abstract = {Background and purpose — Meniscal repair may reduce long-term risk of knee osteoarthritis compared with arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM), whereas patient-reported outcomes may be poorer at short term than for APM. We compared patient-reported outcomes in young adults undergoing meniscal repair or APM up to ∼5 years after surgery.Patients and methods — We included 150 patients aged 18–40 years from the Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS) undergoing meniscal repair or APM. Between-group differences in change in a composite of 4 of 5 Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales (pain, symptoms, sport and recreation, and quality of life—KOOS4) from baseline, 12, and 52 weeks, and a median of 5 years (range 4–6 years) were analyzed using adjusted mixed linear models, with 52 weeks being the primary endpoint.Results — 32 patients had meniscal repair (mean age 26 [SD 6]), and 118 patients underwent APM (mean age 32 [SD 7]). The repair and APM groups improved in KOOS4 from before to 52 weeks after surgery (least square means 7 and 19, respectively; adjusted mean difference –12, [95\% CI –19 to –4] in favor of APM). Both groups improved further from 52 weeks to 5 years after surgery with the difference in KOOS4 scores between the groups remaining similar.Interpretation — Patients having meniscal repair experienced less improvements in patient-reported outcomes from baseline to 52 weeks and 5 years post-surgery. The findings highlight the need for randomized trials comparing these interventions in terms of patient-reported outcomes and knee OA development.},
	number = {0},
	urldate = {2021-05-17},
	journal = {Acta Orthopaedica},
	author = {Pihl, Kenneth and Englund, Martin and Christensen, Robin and Lohmander, L. Stefan and Jørgensen, Uffe and Viberg, Bjarke and Fristed, Jakob Vium and Thorlund, Jonas B.},
	month = apr,
	year = {2021},
	pmid = {33929284},
	note = {Publisher: Taylor \& Francis
\_eprint: https://doi.org/10.1080/17453674.2021.1917826},
	pages = {1--8},
}

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