Ethnicity, development and gender: Tsáchila Indigenous women in Ecuador. RADCLIFFE, S. & PEQUEÑO, A. Development and Change, 41(6):983–1016, 2010.
Ethnicity, development and gender: Tsáchila Indigenous women in Ecuador [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
In recent decades, indigenous populations have become the subjects and agents of development in national and international multicultural policy that acknowledges poverty among indigenous peoples and their historic marginalization from power over development. Although the impact of these legal and programmatic efforts is growing, one persistent axis of disadvantage, male–female difference,1 is rarely taken into account in ethno-development policy and practice. This article argues that assumptions that inform policy related to indigenous women fail to engage with indigenous women’s development concerns. The institutional separation between gender and development policy (GAD) and multiculturalism means that provisions for gender in multicultural policies are inadequate, and ethnic rights in GAD policies are invisible. Drawing on post-colonial feminism, the paper examines ethnicity and gender as interlocking systems that structure indigenous women’s development experiences. These arguments are illustrated in relation to the case of the Tsa ́chila ethno-cultural group in the South American country of Ecuador.
@article{radcliffe_ethnicity_2010,
	series = {Latin {America} / {Caribbean}},
	title = {Ethnicity, development and gender: {Tsáchila} {Indigenous} women in {Ecuador}},
	volume = {41},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7660.2010.01671.x},
	doi = {10.1111/j.1467-7660.2010.01671.x},
	abstract = {In recent decades, indigenous populations have become the subjects and agents of development in national and international multicultural policy that acknowledges poverty among indigenous peoples and their historic marginalization from power over development. Although the impact of these legal and programmatic efforts is growing, one persistent axis of disadvantage, male–female difference,1 is rarely taken into account in ethno-development policy and practice. This article argues that assumptions that inform policy related to indigenous women fail to engage with indigenous women’s development concerns. The institutional separation between gender and development policy (GAD) and multiculturalism means that provisions for gender in multicultural policies are inadequate, and ethnic rights in GAD policies are invisible. Drawing on post-colonial feminism, the paper examines ethnicity and gender as interlocking systems that structure indigenous women’s development experiences. These arguments are illustrated in relation to the case of the Tsa ́chila ethno-cultural group in the South American country of Ecuador.},
	language = {en},
	number = {6},
	journal = {Development and Change},
	author = {RADCLIFFE, Sarah and PEQUEÑO, Andrea},
	year = {2010},
	keywords = {Language: English, Region: Latin America / Caribbean},
	pages = {983--1016},
	file = {RADCLIFFE et PEQUEÑO - 2010 - Ethnicity, development and gender Tsáchila Indige.pdf:/Users/bastien/Zotero/storage/B46LUED9/RADCLIFFE et PEQUEÑO - 2010 - Ethnicity, development and gender Tsáchila Indige.pdf:application/pdf},
}

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