Exploring Investigator Networks in Clinical Tripals. Rake, B., D’Este, P., & McKelvey, M. In Joseph A. Schumpeter Society.
abstract   bibtex   
The objective of this paper is to explore the endogenous dynamics within a network of clinical trial investigators. Clinical trials provide an ideal context for our study since clinical trial investigators need to collaborate in the management of geographically dispersed clinical trials. Moreover, the interdependent nature of trial-related tasks requires bio-medical knowledge from different (sub-)disciplines (Hoekman et al., 2012; Malterud, 2001; Patel et al., 1999). Since most investigators are trained in one specific scientific discipline but lack knowledge in other disciplines (FitzGerald, 2005), cross-disciplinary collaboration with experienced investigators and professional networks provide opportunities to access the required skills and to transfer knowledge (O‘Connell and Roblin, 2006; Reagans and McEvily, 2003; Uzzi and Lancaster, 2003). In contrast to the large amount of anecdotal evidence within the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry suggesting that clinical trial investigators can influence the success of clinical research (Huckman and Zinner, 2008), empirical evidence based on sophisticated analyses of investigators’ importance for clinical trials outcomes is quite scarce. This is surprising since the investigators are, as lead scientists of clinical trials, responsible and accountable for how the entire clinical study is conducted (Hoekman et al., 2012). Moreover, the increased access to diverse knowledge enables investigators to balance their knowledge between basic and clinical research which increases the likelihood of clinical trial success in individual as well as collaborative clinical research (Assmus and Haeussler, 2017).
@inproceedings{rake_exploring_2018,
	location = {Seoul, Korea},
	title = {Exploring Investigator Networks in Clinical Tripals},
	abstract = {The objective of this paper is to explore the endogenous dynamics within a network of clinical trial investigators. Clinical trials provide an ideal context for our study since clinical trial investigators need to collaborate in the management of geographically dispersed clinical trials. Moreover, the interdependent nature of trial-related tasks requires bio-medical knowledge from different (sub-)disciplines (Hoekman et al., 2012; Malterud, 2001; Patel et al., 1999). Since most investigators are trained in one specific scientific discipline but lack knowledge in other disciplines ({FitzGerald}, 2005), cross-disciplinary collaboration with experienced investigators and professional networks provide opportunities to access the required skills and to transfer knowledge (O‘Connell and Roblin, 2006; Reagans and {McEvily}, 2003; Uzzi and Lancaster, 2003). In contrast to the large amount of anecdotal evidence within the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry suggesting that clinical trial investigators can influence the success of clinical research (Huckman and Zinner, 2008), empirical evidence based on sophisticated analyses of investigators’ importance for clinical trials outcomes is quite scarce. This is surprising since the investigators are, as lead scientists of clinical trials, responsible and accountable for how the entire clinical study is conducted (Hoekman et al., 2012). Moreover, the increased access to diverse knowledge enables investigators to balance their knowledge between basic and clinical research which increases the likelihood of clinical trial success in individual as well as collaborative clinical research (Assmus and Haeussler, 2017).},
	eventtitle = {17th International Joseph A. Schumpeter Society Conference: Innovation, Catch-up, and Sustainable Development},
	publisher = {Joseph A. Schumpeter Society},
	author = {Rake, Bastian and D’Este, Pablo and {McKelvey}, Maureen},
	date = {2018-06},
}
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