Greenhouse and field evaluations of transgenic canola against diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, and corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea. Ramachandran, S.; Buntin, G., D.; All, J., N.; Raymer, P., L.; and Stewart, C., N. Entomologia Experimentalis Et Applicata, 88(1):17-24, 1998.
abstract   bibtex   
Canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars Oscar and Westar, engineered with a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cryIA(c) gene, were evaluated for resistance to lepidopterous pests, diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L. (Plutellidae) and corn earworm, Helicoverpa tea (Boddie) (Noctuidae) in greenhouse and field conditions. In greenhouse preference assays conducted at vegetative and flowering plant stages, transgenic plants recorded very low levels of damage. A 100% diamondback moth mortality and approximate to 90% corn earworm mortality were obtained on transgenic plants in greenhouse antibiosis assays. The surviving corn earworm larvae on transgenic plants had reduced head capsule width and body weight. Mortality of diamondback moth and corn earworm were 100% and approximate to 95%, respectively, at different growth stages (seedling, vegetative, bolting, and flowering) on the transgenic plants in greenhouse tests. In field tests conducted during 1995-1997, plots were artificially infested with neonates of diamondback moth or corn earworm or left for natural infestation. Transgenic plants in all the treatments were highly resistant to diamondback moth and corn earworm larvae and had very low levels of defoliation. Plots infested with diamondback moth larvae had greater damage in both seasons as compared with corn earworm infested plots and plots under natural infestation. After exposure to defoliators, transgenic plants usually had higher final plant stand and produced more pods and seeds than non-transgenic plants. Diamondback moth injury caused the most pronounced difference in plant stand and pod and seed number between transgenic and non-transgenic plants. Our results suggest that transgenic canola could be used for effective management of diamondback moth and corn earworm on canola.
@article{
 title = {Greenhouse and field evaluations of transgenic canola against diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, and corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea},
 type = {article},
 year = {1998},
 pages = {17-24},
 volume = {88},
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 last_modified = {2012-01-05T13:14:52.000Z},
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 source_type = {Journal Article},
 abstract = {Canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars Oscar and Westar, engineered with a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cryIA(c) gene, were evaluated for resistance to lepidopterous pests, diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L. (Plutellidae) and corn earworm, Helicoverpa tea (Boddie) (Noctuidae) in greenhouse and field conditions. In greenhouse preference assays conducted at vegetative and flowering plant stages, transgenic plants recorded very low levels of damage. A 100% diamondback moth mortality and approximate to 90% corn earworm mortality were obtained on transgenic plants in greenhouse antibiosis assays. The surviving corn earworm larvae on transgenic plants had reduced head capsule width and body weight. Mortality of diamondback moth and corn earworm were 100% and approximate to 95%, respectively, at different growth stages (seedling, vegetative, bolting, and flowering) on the transgenic plants in greenhouse tests. In field tests conducted during 1995-1997, plots were artificially infested with neonates of diamondback moth or corn earworm or left for natural infestation. Transgenic plants in all the treatments were highly resistant to diamondback moth and corn earworm larvae and had very low levels of defoliation. Plots infested with diamondback moth larvae had greater damage in both seasons as compared with corn earworm infested plots and plots under natural infestation. After exposure to defoliators, transgenic plants usually had higher final plant stand and produced more pods and seeds than non-transgenic plants. Diamondback moth injury caused the most pronounced difference in plant stand and pod and seed number between transgenic and non-transgenic plants. Our results suggest that transgenic canola could be used for effective management of diamondback moth and corn earworm on canola.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Ramachandran, S and Buntin, G D and All, J N and Raymer, P L and Stewart, C N},
 journal = {Entomologia Experimentalis Et Applicata},
 number = {1}
}
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