Efficient generation of closed magnetic flux surfaces in a large spherical tokamak using coaxial helicity injection. Raman, R.; Nelson, B., A.; Bell, M., G.; Jarboe, T., R.; Mueller, D.; Bigelow, T.; Leblanc, B.; Maqueda, R.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; and Wilson, R. Physical Review Letters, 97(17):1-4, 2006.
Efficient generation of closed magnetic flux surfaces in a large spherical tokamak using coaxial helicity injection [pdf]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
A method of coaxial helicity injection has successfully produced a closed flux current without the use of the central solenoid in the NSTX device, on a size scale closer to a spherical torus reactor, for a proof-of-principle demonstration of this concept. For the first time, a remarkable 60 times current multiplication factor was achieved. Grad-Shafranov plasma equilibrium reconstructions are used to verify the existence of closed flux current. In some discharges the generated current persists for a surprisingly long time approximately 400 ms.
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 title = {Efficient generation of closed magnetic flux surfaces in a large spherical tokamak using coaxial helicity injection},
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 year = {2006},
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 abstract = {A method of coaxial helicity injection has successfully produced a closed flux current without the use of the central solenoid in the NSTX device, on a size scale closer to a spherical torus reactor, for a proof-of-principle demonstration of this concept. For the first time, a remarkable 60 times current multiplication factor was achieved. Grad-Shafranov plasma equilibrium reconstructions are used to verify the existence of closed flux current. In some discharges the generated current persists for a surprisingly long time approximately 400 ms.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Raman, R. and Nelson, B. A. and Bell, M. G. and Jarboe, T. R. and Mueller, D. and Bigelow, T. and Leblanc, B. and Maqueda, R. and Menard, J. and Ono, M. and Wilson, R.},
 journal = {Physical Review Letters},
 number = {17}
}
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