Transnational solidarity among political elites: what determines support for financial redistribution within the EU in times of crisis?. Reinl, A. & Giebler, H. European Political Science Review, 2021. ECC: 0000000 Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Transnational solidarity among political elites: what determines support for financial redistribution within the EU in times of crisis? [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
As a consequence of the European Economic Crisis, the European Union (EU) has implanted mechanisms to assist fellow member states facing economic difficulties. Despite an increasing academic interest in public preferences for such intra-EU solidarity measures, research has so far largely ignored individual characteristics that could possibly influence politicians’ views. In this paper, we look at politicians’ preferences for transnational solidarity and argue that these preferences depend on attitudes regarding socioeconomic issues as well as attitudes related to the EU. Moreover, we hypothesize that the relationship is moderated by responsibility attribution and the economic situation in a country. Using survey data of about 4000 politicians running for office in nine EU countries, we find that transnational solidarity is more common for socioeconomically left-wing and pro-EU politicians. Yet, attitudinal differences only cease to matter when the beneficiary state is perceived responsible for the crisis and economic problems at home are low.
@article{reinl_transnational_2021,
	title = {Transnational solidarity among political elites: what determines support for financial redistribution within the {EU} in times of crisis?},
	issn = {1755-7739, 1755-7747},
	shorttitle = {Transnational solidarity among political elites},
	url = {https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/european-political-science-review/article/transnational-solidarity-among-political-elites-what-determines-support-for-financial-redistribution-within-the-eu-in-times-of-crisis/F7A27B4185506D96251EDD7AD8C2D174#article},
	doi = {10.1017/S1755773921000138},
	abstract = {As a consequence of the European Economic Crisis, the European Union (EU) has implanted mechanisms to assist fellow member states facing economic difficulties. Despite an increasing academic interest in public preferences for such intra-EU solidarity measures, research has so far largely ignored individual characteristics that could possibly influence politicians’ views. In this paper, we look at politicians’ preferences for transnational solidarity and argue that these preferences depend on attitudes regarding socioeconomic issues as well as attitudes related to the EU. Moreover, we hypothesize that the relationship is moderated by responsibility attribution and the economic situation in a country. Using survey data of about 4000 politicians running for office in nine EU countries, we find that transnational solidarity is more common for socioeconomically left-wing and pro-EU politicians. Yet, attitudinal differences only cease to matter when the beneficiary state is perceived responsible for the crisis and economic problems at home are low.},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2021-06-27},
	journal = {European Political Science Review},
	author = {Reinl, Ann-Kathrin and Giebler, Heiko},
	year = {2021},
	note = {ECC: 0000000 
Publisher: Cambridge University Press},
	keywords = {European Union, economic crisis, politicians, solidarity},
	pages = {1--20},
}

Downloads: 0