Elevated cortical zinc in Alzheimer disease. Religa, D.; Strozyk, D.; Cherny, R. A.; Volitakis, I.; Haroutunian, V.; Winblad, B.; Naslund, J.; and Bush, A. I. Neurology, 67(1):69–75, July, 2006.
Elevated cortical zinc in Alzheimer disease [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Objective: To determine whether changes in brain biometals in Alzheimer disease (AD) and in normal brain tissue are tandemly associated with amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) burden and dementia severity. Methods: The authors measured zinc, copper, iron, manganese, and aluminum and Aβ levels in postmortem neocortical tissue from patients with AD (n = 10), normal age-matched control subjects (n = 14), patients with schizophrenia (n = 26), and patients with schizophrenia with amyloid (n = 8). Severity of cognitive impairment was assessed with the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR). Results: There was a significant, more than twofold, increase of tissue zinc in the AD-affected cortex compared with the other groups. Zinc levels increased with tissue amyloid levels. Zinc levels were significantly elevated in the most severely demented cases (CDR 4 to 5) and in cases that had an amyloid burden greater than 8 plaques/mm2. Levels of other metals did not differ between groups. Conclusions: Brain zinc accumulation is a prominent feature of advanced Alzheimer disease (AD) and is biochemically linked to brain amyloid β-peptide accumulation and dementia severity in AD.
@article{religa_elevated_2006,
	title = {Elevated cortical zinc in {Alzheimer} disease},
	volume = {67},
	issn = {0028-3878, 1526-632X},
	url = {http://www.neurology.org/content/67/1/69},
	doi = {10.1212/01.wnl.0000223644.08653.b5},
	abstract = {Objective: To determine whether changes in brain biometals in Alzheimer disease (AD) and in normal brain tissue are tandemly associated with amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) burden and dementia severity.
Methods: The authors measured zinc, copper, iron, manganese, and aluminum and Aβ levels in postmortem neocortical tissue from patients with AD (n = 10), normal age-matched control subjects (n = 14), patients with schizophrenia (n = 26), and patients with schizophrenia with amyloid (n = 8). Severity of cognitive impairment was assessed with the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR).
Results: There was a significant, more than twofold, increase of tissue zinc in the AD-affected cortex compared with the other groups. Zinc levels increased with tissue amyloid levels. Zinc levels were significantly elevated in the most severely demented cases (CDR 4 to 5) and in cases that had an amyloid burden greater than 8 plaques/mm2. Levels of other metals did not differ between groups.
Conclusions: Brain zinc accumulation is a prominent feature of advanced Alzheimer disease (AD) and is biochemically linked to brain amyloid β-peptide accumulation and dementia severity in AD.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2016-11-21TZ},
	journal = {Neurology},
	author = {Religa, D. and Strozyk, D. and Cherny, R. A. and Volitakis, I. and Haroutunian, V. and Winblad, B. and Naslund, J. and Bush, A. I.},
	month = jul,
	year = {2006},
	pages = {69--75}
}
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