HOx concentrations and OH reactivity observations in New York City during PMTACS-NY2001. Ren, X., R., Harder, H., Martinez, M., Lesher, R., L., Oliger, A., Shirley, T., Adams, J., Simpas, J., B., & Brune, W., H. Atmospheric Environment, 37(26):3627-3637, 2003.
HOx concentrations and OH reactivity observations in New York City during PMTACS-NY2001 [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals (collectively called HOx) were measured by a laser-induced fluorescence instrument during the PMTACS-NY (PM2.5 Technology Assessment and Characterization Study-New York) intensive campaign in New York City in summer 2001. Measurement results for OH and HO2 are presented for the month-long study. The detection limits were about 3.0 x 10(5) cm(-3) for OH and 2.5 x 10(6) cm(-3) (similar to0.1 ppt) for HO2 with a 1-min integration time and a 2sigma confidence level. The daytime maximum concentrations were 5-20 x 10(6) cm(-3) for OH and 0.4-6 x 10(8) cm(-3) (2-24 pptv) for HO2, usually appearing later than the peak of ozone photolysis frequency, J((OD)-D-1). Relative high OH and HO2 persisted into early evening and were frequently observed during nighttime. The ratios of HO2 to OH were typically between 5 and 40, which are smaller than those obtained in relatively clean environments. The OH reactivity, measured by an instrument named total OH loss rate measurement was on average 19+/-3 s(-1) in this urban environment. It was the highest in the morning and the lowest in the afternoon. The comparison of measured OH and HO2 with model calculations is given in a companion paper (OH and HO2 chemistry in the urban atmosphere of New York City, Atmospheric Environment (2003a) this issue). (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
@article{
 title = {HOx concentrations and OH reactivity observations in New York City during PMTACS-NY2001},
 type = {article},
 year = {2003},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {deciduous forest,field campaign,hydroperoxy radical,hydroxyl radical,hydroxyl radicals,laser-induced fluorescence,measurement,mechanism,nighttime hydroxyl,north-western greece/,ozone,pem-tropics,photochemistry experiment,tropospheric oh,urban environment},
 pages = {3627-3637},
 volume = {37},
 websites = {<Go to ISI>://000184353300002},
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 abstract = {Hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals (collectively called HOx) were measured by a laser-induced fluorescence instrument during the PMTACS-NY (PM2.5 Technology Assessment and Characterization Study-New York) intensive campaign in New York City in summer 2001. Measurement results for OH and HO2 are presented for the month-long study. The detection limits were about 3.0 x 10(5) cm(-3) for OH and 2.5 x 10(6) cm(-3) (similar to0.1 ppt) for HO2 with a 1-min integration time and a 2sigma confidence level. The daytime maximum concentrations were 5-20 x 10(6) cm(-3) for OH and 0.4-6 x 10(8) cm(-3) (2-24 pptv) for HO2, usually appearing later than the peak of ozone photolysis frequency, J((OD)-D-1). Relative high OH and HO2 persisted into early evening and were frequently observed during nighttime. The ratios of HO2 to OH were typically between 5 and 40, which are smaller than those obtained in relatively clean environments. The OH reactivity, measured by an instrument named total OH loss rate measurement was on average 19+/-3 s(-1) in this urban environment. It was the highest in the morning and the lowest in the afternoon. The comparison of measured OH and HO2 with model calculations is given in a companion paper (OH and HO2 chemistry in the urban atmosphere of New York City, Atmospheric Environment (2003a) this issue). (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Ren, X R and Harder, H and Martinez, M and Lesher, R L and Oliger, A and Shirley, T and Adams, J and Simpas, J B and Brune, W H},
 journal = {Atmospheric Environment},
 number = {26}
}
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