Monitoring the potential impact of a wind development site on bats in the Northeast. Reynolds, D., S. Journal of Wildlife Management, 70(5):1219-1227, 2006.
abstract   bibtex   
Recent observations in the eastern United States suggest that bat communities can be at substantial risk of turbine-related mortality. Given that wind power development is the fastest growing energy sector in the world, there is an immediate need to develop survey protocols that can reliably assess the potential risk of future wind power development on both resident and migratory bat populations. I surveyed the Maple Ridge Wind Project site in New York, USA, during the spring migratory season and summer reproductive season using acoustic monitoring and mist net capture techniques. Bat activity was low across the project site during the summer months. The bats I observed at the site flew near the tree canopy, well below turbine height. Acoustic survey data collected during the spring migratory season suggests migratory behavior is highly episodic, being higher on warmer days with lower wind speeds. Knowledge of the influence of meteorological conditions on bat migration will require data on the spatial and temporal components of this behavior. Although acoustic monitoring using vertical acoustic arrays is currently limited to measuring the risk of bat mortality at wind development sites, it may be a valuable tool to increase our knowledge of the migratory phenology of bats.
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 title = {Monitoring the potential impact of a wind development site on bats in the Northeast},
 type = {article},
 year = {2006},
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 keywords = {acoustic monitoring,an aggressive renewable portfolio,anabat,and silver-haired bat,lasionycteris,lasiurus borealis,migration,myotis spp,new york,new york state has,red bat,tug hill plateau,wind power},
 pages = {1219-1227},
 volume = {70},
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 abstract = {Recent observations in the eastern United States suggest that bat communities can be at substantial risk of turbine-related mortality. Given that wind power development is the fastest growing energy sector in the world, there is an immediate need to develop survey protocols that can reliably assess the potential risk of future wind power development on both resident and migratory bat populations. I surveyed the Maple Ridge Wind Project site in New York, USA, during the spring migratory season and summer reproductive season using acoustic monitoring and mist net capture techniques. Bat activity was low across the project site during the summer months. The bats I observed at the site flew near the tree canopy, well below turbine height. Acoustic survey data collected during the spring migratory season suggests migratory behavior is highly episodic, being higher on warmer days with lower wind speeds. Knowledge of the influence of meteorological conditions on bat migration will require data on the spatial and temporal components of this behavior. Although acoustic monitoring using vertical acoustic arrays is currently limited to measuring the risk of bat mortality at wind development sites, it may be a valuable tool to increase our knowledge of the migratory phenology of bats.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Reynolds, D. Scott},
 journal = {Journal of Wildlife Management},
 number = {5}
}
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