It’s time to address sexual violence in academic global health. Ridde, V., Dagenais, C., & Daigneault, I. BMJ Global Health, 4(2):e001616, April, 2019.
It’s time to address sexual violence in academic global health [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Looking back over the first year of the global #MeToo movement that brought sexual violence (from harassment to coercion and assault) out in the open,1 we note that this issue has received little attention in academic global health. Recent cases of sexual misconduct in Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS)2 and Oxfam show that the global health community must act to address this problem.3 In just a few months, the #MeToo movement raised awareness, stimulated new debates and placed this issue squarely on the public agenda in politics, business and entertainment. But academic global health still does not adequately prepare (women and men) students and academics for this problem; and recent discussions on global health training ignore the problem.4 Indeed, there is an urgent need to implement evidence-based comprehensive and integrated prevention strategies to address sexual violence in global health academic research.5 Collaboration between partners from countries with unequal incomes and power is common in academic global health.6 7 While challenges of power, money, publication, data use, and so on, within such collaborations are widely discussed,6 8–10 there is relative silence around sexual violence. Gender inequality in global health is increasingly discussed11—as scientific panels are often composed of a majority of (or only) men and the work of unpaid young women represents a large proportion of global health internships.12 There is a new movement to highlight women leaders in global health,13 and junior women researchers are calling to depatriarchalise science for French-speaking women.14 Despite these discussions, the general lack of consideration for sexuality issues in research fieldwork remains.15 16 In 1985, Gurney stated, “ for female fieldworkers, reciprocity… may be problematic if powerful males in the setting expect sexual favors in return for research …
@article{ridde_its_2019,
	title = {It’s time to address sexual violence in academic global health},
	volume = {4},
	copyright = {© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/},
	issn = {2059-7908},
	url = {https://gh.bmj.com/content/4/2/e001616},
	doi = {10.1136/bmjgh-2019-001616},
	abstract = {Looking back over the first year of the global \#MeToo movement that brought sexual violence (from harassment to coercion and assault) out in the open,1 we note that this issue has received little attention in academic global health. Recent cases of sexual misconduct in Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS)2 and Oxfam show that the global health community must act to address this problem.3 In just a few months, the \#MeToo movement raised awareness, stimulated new debates and placed this issue squarely on the public agenda in politics, business and entertainment. But academic global health still does not adequately prepare (women and men) students and academics for this problem; and recent discussions on global health training ignore the problem.4 Indeed, there is an urgent need to implement evidence-based comprehensive and integrated prevention strategies to address sexual violence in global health academic research.5

Collaboration between partners from countries with unequal incomes and power is common in academic global health.6 7 While challenges of power, money, publication, data use, and so on, within such collaborations are widely discussed,6 8–10 there is relative silence around sexual violence. Gender inequality in global health is increasingly discussed11—as scientific panels are often composed of a majority of (or only) men and the work of unpaid young women represents a large proportion of global health internships.12 There is a new movement to highlight women leaders in global health,13 and junior women researchers are calling to depatriarchalise science for French-speaking women.14 Despite these discussions, the general lack of consideration for sexuality issues in research fieldwork remains.15 16 In 1985, Gurney stated, “ for female fieldworkers, reciprocity… may be problematic if powerful males in the setting expect sexual favors in return for research …},
	language = {en},
	number = {2},
	urldate = {2019-09-26},
	journal = {BMJ Global Health},
	author = {Ridde, Valery and Dagenais, Christian and Daigneault, Isabelle},
	month = apr,
	year = {2019},
	keywords = {Libre accès, Membre RENARD},
	pages = {e001616},
}

Downloads: 0