Reconstructing Volume Tracking. Rider, W. J. and Kothe, D. B. Journal of Computational Physics, 141(2):112--152, April, 1998.
Reconstructing Volume Tracking [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
A new algorithm for the volume tracking of interfaces in two dimensions is presented. The algorithm is based upon a well-defined, second-order geometric solution of a volume evolution equation. The method utilizes local discrete material volume and velocity data to track interfaces of arbitrarily complex topology. A linearity-preserving, piecewise linear interface geometry approximation ensures that solutions generated retain second-order spatial accuracy. Second-order temporal accuracy is achieved by virtue of a multidimensional unsplit time integration scheme. We detail our geometrically based solution method, in which material volume fluxes are computed systematically with a set of simple geometric tasks. We then interrogate the method by testing its ability to track interfaces through large, controlled topology changes, whereby an initially simple interface configuration is subjected to vortical flows. Numerical results for these strenuous test problems provide evidence for the algorithm's improved solution quality and accuracy.
@article{rider_reconstructing_1998,
	title = {Reconstructing {Volume} {Tracking}},
	volume = {141},
	issn = {0021-9991},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002199919895906X},
	doi = {10.1006/jcph.1998.5906},
	abstract = {A new algorithm for the volume tracking of interfaces in two dimensions is presented. The algorithm is based upon a well-defined, second-order geometric solution of a volume evolution equation. The method utilizes local discrete material volume and velocity data to track interfaces of arbitrarily complex topology. A linearity-preserving, piecewise linear interface geometry approximation ensures that solutions generated retain second-order spatial accuracy. Second-order temporal accuracy is achieved by virtue of a multidimensional unsplit time integration scheme. We detail our geometrically based solution method, in which material volume fluxes are computed systematically with a set of simple geometric tasks. We then interrogate the method by testing its ability to track interfaces through large, controlled topology changes, whereby an initially simple interface configuration is subjected to vortical flows. Numerical results for these strenuous test problems provide evidence for the algorithm's improved solution quality and accuracy.},
	number = {2},
	urldate = {2014-06-14TZ},
	journal = {Journal of Computational Physics},
	author = {Rider, William J. and Kothe, Douglas B.},
	month = apr,
	year = {1998},
	pages = {112--152}
}
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