The rationale of interorganizational linkages to connect multiple sites of expertise, knowledge production, and knowledge transfer: An example from HIV/AIDS services for the inner city. Rier, D., A. and Indyk, D. Social work in health care, 42(3-4):9-27, 2006.
The rationale of interorganizational linkages to connect multiple sites of expertise, knowledge production, and knowledge transfer: An example from HIV/AIDS services for the inner city [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
This paper presents the rationale for a long-running project in which various community-based and tertiary-based providers are being linked to each other in order to understand, reach, and engage high-risk, hard-to-reach inner-city residents for prevention, treatment, and management of HIV/AIDS. Not simply a program to link disparate actors, the work has developed into a more fundamental approach through which to build and maintain the infrastructure required to generate and sustain knowledge development and integration within and between systems. This work is grounded in the recognition that each type of provider, as well as patients and clients themselves, has a particular type of expertise. All forms of expertise are necessary to fight HIV/AIDS. Different forms of expertise are necessary to diagnose, treat, prevent, and cure HIV/AIDS and its sequelae. This work suggests revisions in traditional approaches to expertise and to the content and geometry of dissemination networks, and ultimately challenges the very concepts of dissemination and the lay/scientific boundary. © 2006 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.
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 title = {The rationale of interorganizational linkages to connect multiple sites of expertise, knowledge production, and knowledge transfer: An example from HIV/AIDS services for the inner city},
 type = {article},
 year = {2006},
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 keywords = {AIDS,Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome,Clinical Trials,Community-Institutional Relations,Delivery of Health Care, Integrated,Diffusion of Innovation,Dissemination,HIV Infections,Health Services Research,Hospitals, Urban,Human immunodeficiency virus infection,Humans,Interinstitutional Relations,Mental Health Services,Models, Organizational,Networks,New York City,Organizations,Social Work,Sociology of knowledge,Sociology of science,Sociology, Medical,Systems Integration,Urban Health Services,acquired immune deficiency syndrome,expert system,geometry,health care,health care system,health program,health service,high risk population,human,infection prevention,information dissemination,mortality,population research,professional knowledge,public health,residential home,review,science,tertiary health care},
 pages = {9-27},
 volume = {42},
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 city = {Affiliation: Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel; Affiliation: Department of Community and Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States; Affiliation: Department of Community },
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 abstract = {This paper presents the rationale for a long-running project in which various community-based and tertiary-based providers are being linked to each other in order to understand, reach, and engage high-risk, hard-to-reach inner-city residents for prevention, treatment, and management of HIV/AIDS. Not simply a program to link disparate actors, the work has developed into a more fundamental approach through which to build and maintain the infrastructure required to generate and sustain knowledge development and integration within and between systems. This work is grounded in the recognition that each type of provider, as well as patients and clients themselves, has a particular type of expertise. All forms of expertise are necessary to fight HIV/AIDS. Different forms of expertise are necessary to diagnose, treat, prevent, and cure HIV/AIDS and its sequelae. This work suggests revisions in traditional approaches to expertise and to the content and geometry of dissemination networks, and ultimately challenges the very concepts of dissemination and the lay/scientific boundary. © 2006 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Rier, D A and Indyk, D},
 journal = {Social work in health care},
 number = {3-4}
}
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