Evidence of a basic level in event taxonomies. Rifkin, A. Memory & Cognition, 13(6):538--56, 1985. 00000
abstract   bibtex   
The proposition that event taxonomies have a "basic" level was tested. In the first two tasks of the experiment, taxonomically related event categories were elicited. Nine taxonomies were constructed from subjects' responses on these tasks. In the third task, subjects listed attributes for events categoriesfrom the three levels of abstraction ofthese taxonomies. A single, common level of abstraction (the basic level) was identified. Subjects listed significantly more attributes for basic categories than for superordinate categories, but not significantly more attributes for the lower, subordinate-level categories. Further analyses showed that basic and subordinate categories elicited a greater number of concrete and event-related featuresthan action and personrelated features, and that superordinate categories showed the opposite trend. These findings are discussed in terms ofgeneral principles ofcategorization applied to events, objects, and scenes, and the particular characteristics of events.
@article{rifkin_evidence_1985,
	title = {Evidence of a basic level in event taxonomies},
	volume = {13},
	abstract = {The proposition that event taxonomies have a "basic" level was tested. In the first two tasks of the experiment, taxonomically related event categories were elicited. Nine taxonomies were constructed from subjects' responses on these tasks. In the third task, subjects listed attributes for events categoriesfrom the three levels of abstraction ofthese taxonomies. A single, common level of abstraction (the basic level) was identified. Subjects listed significantly more attributes for basic categories than for superordinate categories, but not significantly more attributes for the lower, subordinate-level categories. Further analyses showed that basic and subordinate categories elicited a greater number of concrete and event-related featuresthan action and personrelated features, and that superordinate categories showed the opposite trend. These findings are discussed in terms ofgeneral principles ofcategorization applied to events, objects, and scenes, and the particular characteristics of events.},
	number = {6},
	journal = {Memory \& Cognition},
	author = {Rifkin, Anthony},
	year = {1985},
	note = {00000},
	pages = {538--56}
}
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